guide to infor. speeches - A Detailed Guide to Informative...

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A Detailed Guide to Informative Speeches and Presentations In this guide, you can learn • about the purposes and types of informative speeches • about writing and delivering informative speeches, and • about the parts of informative speeches • due dates, requirements, and suggested timelines Take a look at the items listed below to get a detailed description of each section: Purposes Informative speaking offers you an opportunity to practice your researching, writing, organizing, and speaking skills. You will learn how to discover and present information clearly. If you take the time to thoroughly research and understand your topic, to create a clearly organized speech, and to practice an enthusiastic, dynamic style of delivery, you can be an effective "teacher" during your informative speech. Finally, you will get a chance to practice a type of speaking you will undoubtedly use later in your professional caree r. The purpose of the informative speech is to provide interesting, useful, and unique information to your audience. By dedicating yourself to the goals of providing information and appealing to your audience, you can take a positive step toward succeeding in your efforts as an informative speaker. Major Types In this guide, we focus on informative speeches about: 1. Objects 2. Processes 3. Events 4. Concepts These categories provide an effective method of organizing and evaluating informative speeches. Although they are not absolute, these categories provide a useful starting point for work on your speech. In general, you will use four major types of informative speeches. While you can classify informative speeches many ways, the speech you deliver will fit into one of four major categories: Speeches about objects focus on things existing in the world. Objects include, among other things, people, places, animals, or products. Becau se you are speaking under time constraints, you cannot discuss any topic in its entirety. Instead, limit your speech to a focused discussion of some aspect of your topic. Some example topics for speeches about objects include: the Central Intelligence Agency, tombstones, surgical lasers, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the pituitary gland, and lemmings. To focus these topics, you could give a speech about Franklin Delano Roosevelt and efforts to conceal how he suffered from polio while he was in office. Or, a speech about tombstones could focus on the creation and original designs of grave markers. Speeches about processes focus on patterns of action. One type of speech about processes, the demonstration speech, teaches people "how-to" perform a process. More frequently, however,
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you will use process speeches to explain a process in broader terms. This way, the audience is more likely to understand the importance or the context of the process.
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