Literature Review Paper - Babinec Gina Babinec COMM 280 Kurtz Review of Literature The topic for my final research proposal is focused on discrimination

Literature Review Paper - Babinec Gina Babinec COMM 280...

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Babinec Gina Babinec 11/4/13 COMM 280 Kurtz Review of Literature The topic for my final research proposal is focused on discrimination towards women in the workforce. Getting to this point has been a process, of course, which has involved reading through many different articles pertaining to entirely varying topics. I was over-ambitious at the start of the research proposal assignment because I wanted to tackle, in simplest terms, what types of discrimination and harassment exist towards women in the workforce, academia, and social situations in general. Now, looking back on it, writing about all three seems so extremely out of reach. Since I focused in on my topic, I have found it much easier to do my research. The articles I’ve found range from recorded accounts of personal experience, to surveys and studies done through scientific research, and popular newspaper and magazine articles. All of these have helped me gain insight towards my topic and will act as great references for my final research proposal. When I first began browsing for articles, I found an extremely interesting one in the Chicago Tribune in the Business section that is an accurate example our country’s skewed attitude towards workplace harassment. Its title, “Congratulations! It’s not much easier to get harassed at work: 2 Supreme Court rulings strike a blow against American workers by making it more difficult to hold companies liable for harassment”, clearly conveys the author’s disgust for the rulings. This article, published on July 1, 2013, discusses rulings in the Supreme Court regarding the reporting of harassment in the workplace, and how the rulings will affect the American workforce as a whole. It explains what the rulings were, when the law will be implemented, and who will be
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Babinec affected. As the article states, “Generally speaking, it’s easier for employees to hold companies liable for harassment if the harasser is a supervisor” (Huppke, 1). A supervisor, as defined in the law, is someone who can promote, demote, or fire an employee. They are also the ones who are most surveyed as the ones doing the harassing. So, as put by the author, in any cases where an entire human resources department does the hiring and firing, “possibly all managers [turn] into a co-worker” (1) and are not held accountable. This law, the article explains, is a problem for both men and women, but it pertains to women because they are the main reported victims of sexual harassment in the workplace. The article contains quotes from an esteemed Indiana University Professor of Law, as well as the Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who can be two helpful sources for me in my future researching. The two are not in favor of these rulings, and nor was the author of the article. This Chicago Tribune article is a
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  • Fall '11
  • BillKirkpatrick
  • Discrimination, HARASSMENT, psychological distress

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