L22 - Design3 - We've been looking at functional dependency...

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Based in part on slides from Database System Concepts - 5 th Edition We've been looking at functional dependency theory We've been looking at functional dependency theory ± discussed the definition of a functional dependency ± discussed determination of the closure of a set of fd’s ² Armstrong’s axioms: ± if β⊆α , then α→ β (reflexivity) ± if , then γα→ γ β (augmentation) ± if , and β→γ , then α→ γ (transitivity) ² and extensions to Armstrong’s Axioms: ± If holds a nd α→γ holds, then α→ β γ holds (union) ± If holds, then holds and holds (decomposition) ± If holds a nd γ β→δ holds, then αγ→δ holds (pseudotransitivity) ² and we determined that computing F + using Armstrong’s axioms is a true pain
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Based in part on slides from Database System Concepts - 5 th Edition On Friday On Friday ± We discussed an algorithm for determining the closure of attribute sets result ←α ; while (changes to result ) do for each β→γ in F do begin if β⊆ result then result result ∪γ end ± and we looked at some examples of computing the closure attribute sets with respect to a set of fd’s
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Based in part on slides from Database System Concepts - 5 th Edition Uses of Attribute Closure Uses of Attribute Closure There are several uses of the attribute closure algorithm: ± Testing for superkey: ² To test if α is a superkey, we compute α +, and check if α + contains all attributes of R . ± Testing functional dependencies ² To check if a functional dependency α→β holds (or, in other words, is in F + ), just check if β⊆α + . ² That is, we compute α + by using attribute closure, and then check if it contains β . ² Is a simple and cheap test, and very useful ± Back to looking at how to compute the closure of F ² For each γ⊆ R, we find the closure γ + , and for each S ⊆γ + , we output a functional dependency γ→ S. ² It generates a lot of fd’s, but it is more straightforward and efficient than using the definition directly
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Based in part on slides from Database System Concepts - 5 th Edition Can we do better Can we do better -- -- Canonical Cover Canonical Cover ± Sets of functional dependencies may have redundant dependencies that can be inferred from the others ² For example: A C is redundant in: { A B , B C, A C } ² Parts of a functional dependency may be redundant ± E.g.: on RHS: { A B , B C , A CD } can be simplified to { A B , B C , A D } ± E.g.: on LHS: {A B , B C , AC D } can be simplified to {A B , B C , A D } ± Intuitively, a canonical cover of F is a “minimal” set of functional dependencies equivalent to F, having no redundant dependencies or redundant parts of dependencies
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Based in part on slides from Database System Concepts - 5 th Edition Extraneous Attributes Extraneous Attributes ± Consider a set F
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course EE 468 taught by Professor Conry during the Spring '08 term at Clarkson University .

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L22 - Design3 - We've been looking at functional dependency...

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