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Toward Theory-Based Measures of Conflict ManagementAuthor(s): Evert van de Vliert and Boris KabanoffSource:The Academy of Management Journal, Mar., 1990, Vol. 33, No. 1 (Mar., 1990),pp. 199-209Published by: Academy of ManagementStable URL: JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a widerange of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity andfacilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atAcademy of Managementis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access toThe Academy of Management JournalThis content downloaded from43.239.80.74 on Sun, 06 Jun 2021 12:16:38 UTCAll use subject to
? Academy of Management Journal1990, Vol. 33, No. 1, 199-209.TOWARD THEORY-BASED MEASURESOF CONFLICT MANAGEMENTEVERT VAN DE VLIERTUniversity of GroningenBORIS KABANOFFUniversity of New South WalesThe theory of the managerial grid, a model of interrelations amongstyles of management, was used as the criterion for validating the twobest-known self-report measures of conflict management styles. We re-analyzed six studies that used those measures and found that bothappeared to be moderately valid. However, the measures failed to re-flect the underlying theory in a few respects, which suggested specificareas for improving them.Blake and Mouton's (1964) managerial grid has recently made a stcomeback as a leading thesis in the literature on conflict managemebanoff, 1987; Pruitt & Rubin, 1986; Rahim, 1986; Shockley-ZalabVan de Vliert & Prein, 1989). Most authors have treated the manageras a five-category scheme for classifying behavioral styles or modesdling social conflict. In our view, however, the grid expresses a morscientific theory. The reasoning behind this view follows.First, Blake and Mouton (1964, 1970) theoretically specified tlarities and differences among five styles of conflict management, pthat the styles varied on two dimensions-concern for people andfor production. They devised 9-point dimensions, with 1 representiimum concern and 9, maximum concern (see Figure 1). Other authorlabeled the two dimensions differently (e.g., Rahim, 1983a, 1986; ShZalabak, 1988; Thomas, 1976), but the basic assumptions have rsimilar. People are classified into the five styles on the basis of whifive two-dimensional locations in the grid they psychologicallyBlake and Mouton define the respective styles as follows: avoidipeople concern, 1 on production concern; accommodating, 9 on peopcern, 1 on production concern; compromising, 5 on people concproduction concern; competing, 1 on people concern, 9 on productiocern; and collaborating, 9 on people concern, 9 on production concerimportant to note that the styles are viewed as specific points definetwo dimensions and not as areas.

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Term
Fall
Professor
devlina
Tags
Management, Test, ROCI, M A Rahim, Evert van de Vliert

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