MD4AssgnNardoneM.docx - 1 Informal Reading Assessments for...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 12 pages.

1 Informal Reading Assessments for Literacy Learners Mariah Nardone Master of Science in Education, Walden University READ 6609: Literacy in Academically Diverse Classrooms Dr. Lisa Cline June 4, 2021
2 Informal Reading Assessments for Literacy Learners Part One: Informal Reading Assessments for PreK–3 Literacy Learners As we know, reading has many components in it. It is essential that at a young age, children are beginning the stages of reading. According to Bashir and Hook (2009), “The development of reading fluency is crucial for children as they move away from a conscious focus on word decoding and recognition to the reading of connected text and comprehension" (p. 198). A child will not be fluent in reading until they master recognizing words (Bashir & Hook, 2009). We only have grades third-fifth and departmentalize at our school, so my reading classes have been challenging because I teach mathematics throughout my school day. The child I have selected to do this assignment on is not one of my students. Instead, I have chosen to do a child that I nanny. We will call her Millie, and she five years old and in Kindergarten. She was born and raised in Atlanta. Georgia and has a younger sister. Her parents are very involved in her schooling and love that I take time during my babysitting to working with her. They have shared some details about her reading skills with me as well. This paper will reflect on the literacy assessments used, data analyzed, and next steps for Millie. The first assessment I did with Millie was noncognitive because I do not work with her often in reading; I wanted to understand how she feels towards reading. The assessment was called the "Elementary Reading Attitude Survey," The purpose of the assessment is to get her strengths and limitations with reading. It uses four Garfield pictures to select an answer from twenty questions ranging from very positive to negative towards reading (McKenna & Kear, 1990). Each question is related to reading in some sort. After completing the attitude survey with Millie, it showed me that she genuinely enjoys reading. Most of her answers were a score of
3 three or four, which are positive, and only a few twos were questions about summer vacation or playing outside verse reading. The second assessment I completed with Millie was the concept of print by using Dr. Suess, The Cat in The Hat. I explained to her that the purpose of this assessment is going to show me if she understands the different parts of a book. I gave her the book and asked an assortment of questions. I used a Concept of Print Assessment to provide me with a score out of 22, which she scored a total of 19 points; Her score told me that she is familiar with books and either spends a lot of time reading or being read to. She understood most parts like the cover, title, backside, pictures, letters, words, and which direction to read. She struggled with one-to-one correspondence and punctuation. While going through the story, she did notice that some of the words sounded the same. I explained that means that they are rhyming words.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture