Origin and Evolution of the Solar System - Origin and...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Origin and Evolution of the Solar SystemThe solar system was formed 4.6 ± 0.1 × 10 9 years ago. Astronomers have recognized a number of observable facts about the solar system that are not otherwise the result of obvious physical laws (for example, Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion, which are the direct result of the nature of gravity). But the foundation of science assumes that every observable property must result from some cause. These features must therefore be the direct result of how the solar system formed. The following list outlines these observable facts:All planetary orbits lie nearly in a single plane; in other words, the solar system is flat (the orbit of Pluto is an exception).The Sun's rotational equator is in the same flat plane.Planetary orbits are nearly circular (exceptions are Mercury and Pluto).The planets and Sun all revolve in the same direction, that is, a motion that is west toeast across the sky as viewed from Earth (what astronomers refer to as direct motion).The Sun and planets all rotate in the same direction with obliquities (the tilt betweenthe equatorial and orbital planes) generally small (exceptions are Venus, Uranus, and Pluto).Planets and most asteroids have similar rotational periods (exceptions are Mercury, Pluto, and Venus).Planets are regularly spaced (this is often expressed in the form of a simple mathematical progression, known as Bode's law).The major moons in planetary satellite systems resemble the solar system on a smaller scale (circular orbits, uniform direction of revolution, in a flat plane with regularspacing).Most angular momentum ( mass × velocity × orbital radius) of the solar system is inthe planets (99.8%), whereas most of the mass of the solar system is in the Sun (99.8%). This may be expressed alternatively as a question: Why does the sun rotate so slowly?Differences in chemical composition exist throughout the solar system, with dense, metalrich (terrestrial) planets found close to the sun, but giant, hydrogenrich (gas) planets only in the outer part of the solar system. In addition, the chemical compositionof meteorites, while similar, is not identical to all known planetary and lunar rocks.
Comets exist in a much larger, spherical cloud surrounding the solar system.Throughout the years, people have come up with a variety of theories to explain the observable features of the solar system. Some of these theories include socalledcatastrophe theories, such as a near collision of the Sun with another star. Modern 

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 5 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Winter
Professor
Craig

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture