These are lecture notes for Chem 115, filled out and complete. For lecture 26

These are lecture notes for Chem 115, filled out and complete. For lecture 26

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CHM 115-M CHM 115-M 11-26-07 11-26-07 Section M-01 at 11:30 AM Section M-02 at 2:30 PM
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Reading for this week, Interchapter: The Chemistry of Modern Materials Pages 643-655 Lab for This Week Gold nanoparticles (Chapter 13)
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Summary from Last Time Crystalline versus amorphous structures Crystalline types: atomic, molecular, ionic, metallic, network covalent Three types of cubic crystal lattices Simple cubic: 1 atom/unit cell Body-centered cubic: 2 atoms/unit cell Face-centered cubic: 4 atoms/unit cell Hexagonal close packing crystal lattice
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Microscopic vs. Macroscopic Having looked at the types of crystalline bonds and their molecular-level order, we now will look at the macro-level properties and characteristics of some crystalline materials: Ceramics Metals Semiconductors
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Ceramics Solid inorganic compounds that combine metal and non-metal atoms ___________________________ Examples: Clays Glasses Bricks Cement Tile Sea shells Sea urchin spines made of CaCO 3 and MgCO 3
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Properties of Ceramics Generally they are: Hard Brittle Inflexible Thermal insulators Most are electrical insulators (some conduct electricity) Some are opaque, some are transparent
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Non-crystalline Formed by melting the raw materials and then cooling rapidly • Most common: silicate glasses, derived from SiO 2 Can modify properties by including impurities such as other oxides (Na 2 O, CaO, Al 2 O 3 , etc.) Pyrex glass (used for beakers and other chemistry glassware and for kitchen ovenware) is a borosilicate glass because it incorporates boric oxides. Pyrex glass thus withstands temperature changes much
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These are lecture notes for Chem 115, filled out and complete. For lecture 26

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