Course Notes - Chapter26Phylogeny&theTreeofLife Overview...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 28 pages.

Chapter 26 – Phylogeny & the Tree of Life Overview Phylogeny is the evolutionary history of a species or a group of related species The discipline of systematics classifies organisms and determines their evolutionary relationships Systematists use fossil, molecular, and genetic data to infer evolutionaryrelationships Concept 26.1 – Phylogenies show Evolutionary Relationships Taxonomy is the ordered division and naming of organisms Binomial Nomenclature o In the 18th century, Carolus Linnaeus published a system of taxonomy based on resemblances oTwo key features of his system remain useful today: two-part names forspecies and hierarchical classification oThe two-part scientific name of a species is called binomial o The first part of the name is the genus o The second part, called the specific epithet, is unique for each species within the genus o The first letter of the genus is capitalized, and the entire species name is italicized o Bothparts together name the species (not the specific epithet alone) Hierarchical Classification o Linnaeus introduced a system for grouping species in increasingly broad categories o The taxonomic groups from broad to narrow are domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species o A taxonomic unit at any level of hierarchy is called taxon Linking Classification and Phylogeny o Systematists depict evolutionary relationships in branching phylogenetic trees o Linnaean classification and phylogeny can differ from each other o Systematists have proposed
the PhyloCode, which recognizes only groups that include a common ancestor and all its descendents oA phylogenetic tree represents a hypothesis about evolutionary relationships o Each branch point (node) represents the divergence of two species o Sister taxa are groups that share an immediate common ancestor o A rooted tree includes a branch to represent the last common ancestor of all taxa in the tree opolytomy is a branch from which more than two groups emerge What We Can and Cannot Learn from Phylogenetic Trees o Phylogenetic trees do show patterns of descent o Phylogenetic trees do not indicate when species evolved howmuch genetic change occurred in a lineage o It shouldn’t be assumed that a taxon evolved from the taxon next to it Concept 26.2 – Phylogenies are Inferred from Morphological and MolecularData To infer phylogenies, Systematists gather information about morphologies, genes, and biochemistry of living organisms 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture