Textbook Notes - Chapter4:BiologyofBehaviour...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 49 pages.

Chapter 4: Biology of Behaviour    human brain = 1.5 kg     contains 10 billion – 100 billion nerve cells and about as many helper cells  nerve cells differ in shape, size, and chemicals they produce nerve cells organized into modules (clusters of nerve cells that communicate with each other) that are connected through neural circuits to other modules that communicate with each other    Peirre Flourens – suggested different parts of nervous system were responsible for different functions but conflicting evidence now – some functions more spread out    Donald Hebb (50 years ago) – provided better understanding by showing that nerve cells are organized into larger units – functioning could be understood by individual cells and larger networks they comprisedStructure of Nervous System:    brain – controls behaviour, processes and retains information we receive from environment, and regulates body's physiological processes receives information from body's sensory receptors and is connected withmuscles and glands of body     nervous system consists of two divisions:  central nervous system – brain and spinal cord spinal cord – long, thin collection of nerve cells attached to base of brain and running length of spinal collumn    contains circuits of nerve cells that control some simple reflexes ( pulling away from hot ) communicates with rest of body through nerves     nerves – bundle of nerve fibers that transmit information netween CNS and body's sense organs, muscles, and glands attached to spinal cord and base of brain  peripheral nervous system – cranial and spinal nerves; that part of the nervouse system peripheral to brain and spinal cord consists of nerves that connect central nervous system with sense organs, muscles and glands    human brain has 3 major parts: brain stem, cerebellum, cerbral hemisphere
 lower part of cerebellum and brain stem projects beneath left cerebral hemisphere – upper part is normally hidden (see fig. 4.3)    Brain stem – most primitive regions of brain, and its functions are basic ones – control of physiological functioning and automatic behaviour (amphibeans have brain stem and simple cerebellum)    cerebral hemispheres – constitue large portion of brain  contains parts of brain that evolved most recently: involved in behaviours of particular interest to psychology    cerebellum – attached to bain of brain, looks like miniature version of cerebral hemispheres functions are control and coordination of posture and movement, especially rapid ones    brain is encased in skull and spinal cord runs through middle of hollow bones ( vertebra: vertebral column )    both brain and spinal cord are enclosed in 3 layered set of membrane called meninges    float in clear liquid called cerebrospianl fluid (CSF) fills between 2 meninges, providing cushioning    cerebral cortex – outer layer of cerebral hemisphere of brain, 
 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture