Essays for US History Mid Term - Essay 1 The history of black-white relations in the United States from Reconstruction to the Progressive era 600,000

Essays for US History Mid Term - Essay 1 The history of...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

Essay 1: The history of black-white relations in the United States from Reconstruction to the Progressive era. 600,000 Americans died in the Civil War. With this the 13 th Amendment was established, abolishing slavery. The Freedman’s Bureau was established, to help African Americans receive an education and rights. Slaves began to move out, look for family, or work for their ex.Masters. Slaves tried to gain control over their lives. From Reconstruction to the Progressive era, Blacks struggled to find their new place in American, gaining rights, but in the end, losing their rights as America’s necessity to become whole out prioritized their rights. Basic rights given to Africans Freedman’s Bureau was made to reform black life, and represent them against the South. Thousands of schools were founded, and idealistic northerners came to the South to help Africans attend school and get used to their new lives as freedmans. Blacks and Northerners raised money for schools and teachers. The effort that the Northerns and freedmans showed in educating freedman was impeccable. Since Blacks could not afford land, they had to go through the process of sharecropping with white landowners. They were able to work and live on the land, but had to pay a majority of their crop in order to sustain this policy. Sharecropping ends up an economic disaster, putting Black people into debt due to the price of the land, tools, and crops. Andrew Johnson’s period of Reconstruction When Andrew Johnson replaced Lincoln as president, Reconstruction took a turn for the worse. Andrew Johnson was a Southern Democrat, and was very lenient towards the Southerners. He did not allow Congress to make any form of reconstruction, saying they had no power to legislate upon that subject. He was in favor of Blacks being emancipated, but did not support Black political and Civil rights. He thought of them as inferior, and did not believe they did not deserve any major rights past being free. He denied Africans the rights to vote. He was also very lenient to the South, not punishing

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture