Visual Arts Paper - Stan Ingberman February 6, 2008 Visual...

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Stan Ingberman February 6, 2008 Visual Arts Paper When I visited the Columbus Museum of Art, there were two particular paintings that really jumped out at me. The first was, The Assassination by James Ensor, depicts three men holding down another man on a table while a fourth man beheads the man on the table with what seems to be an ordinary knife. On the far left there is a man playing a bugler-like instrument and on the right a man pounding a drum and striking symbols. There are also men outside the room looking in through windows. The second painting, Cornice by George Tooker, portrays a man in a blue polo and nice slacks standing on the ledge of a red brick building, grasping the corner with his right hand, looking down in what appears to be a moment before suicide. James Ensor was born on April 13, 1860 in Ostend, Belgium to his father, James Frederic Ensor, and his mother, Maria Catharina Haegheman. In 1876 Ensor attended classes in drawing at Ostend Academy where he painted mostly marines and landscapes. He went on to Arrent Brussels Academie Royale. After leaving, he returned to Ostend where he has a studio in the attic of his parents’ house. Ensor took part in exhibitions for the first time in 1881, sending a painting to the salon of the group La Chrysalide and the Exposition Generale des Beaux-Arts, Brussels. He became a part of the art circle L’Essor and exhibited in its salons. In 1885 Ensor became gravely sick. He still exhibited in the salon but was facing growing hostility from the critics. This sparked his major series of drawing Halos of Christ or the Sensibilities of Light. In 1887 his father died at age 52 which affected the artist deeply. His grandmother on his mother’s side also died. A year
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later he began his most important painting, The Entry of Christ into Brussels . In 1898, Ensor’s first solo exhibition was held in Paris but was met with little success. In 1915 his mother died at 80, followed by his Aunt a year later. In 1920 an important solo exhibition was held in Brussels where Ensor sold six works, including two drawings from Halos of Christ or the Sensibilities of Light . In 1929 the largest ever retrospective of Ensor’s work was the inaugural exhibition at the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, where The Entry of Christ into Brussels was exhibited for the first time. King Albert I raised Ensor to the peerage, and he was give the title of baron. On his 17
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course HUM 111 taught by Professor Maxwell during the Winter '08 term at Columbus State Community College.

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Visual Arts Paper - Stan Ingberman February 6, 2008 Visual...

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