MD7AssgnNardoneM.docx - 1 Developing and Reflecting...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 16 pages.

1 Developing and Reflecting Literacy Lessons for Academically Diverse Learners Mariah Nardone Master of Science in Education, Walden University READ 6609: Literacy in Academically Diverse Classrooms Dr. Lisa Cline June 24, 2021
2 Developing and Reflecting Literacy Lessons for Academically Diverse Learners Teachers are required to teach many learning targets throughout the day. Therefore, we must reach each of them. At our school, we departmentalize, which means that different teachers teach certain subjects. I had never done this before working at my current school, but I believe it is helpful for teachers to meet all the standards. In this paper, I will describe a lesson used to cross-curricular teach. Cross-curricular teaching means blending two subjects within one. It is very beneficial to maximize instructional time and can make learning engaging and fun (Dewey, 2018). The implemented activity was a first-grade literacy and mathematics lesson focusing on number stories within a text (ReadWriteThink, 2015). The activity was completed in a whole group and small group setting. The groups were based on academic needs, and differentiation was provided to meet the needs of the students. The activity started with a read-aloud for the struggling and on-level students. The higher achieving students completed their reading independently. There was also a YouTube read-aloud available for all the groups. Integrating technology with literacy can be a “powerful tool for instruction” (Linik, 2012, p. 25). Within the lesson, there were many literacy standards addressed: write narratives including details, follow agreed-upon rules for discussions, use a drawing or other display to descriptions when appropriate, and actively engaging in a group reading. The mathematics standard was to use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems (Georgia Standards of Excellence, 2016). The students were asked to identify and use key mathematical terms in discussion and writing, draw a series of pictures telling a sequential story that depicts objects being added or taken away, speak and write a sequential narrative that corresponds to their drawings, and state or write equations that correspond to their stories. Each group had the same learning target to complete.
3 The struggling group was read to by me. According to Donne (2011), “time engaged in reading is one element of reading instruction found to be effective with readers who achieve typical results as well as improving outcomes for struggling readers” (p. 7). Before reading The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle, we did a picture walk. During the picture walk, we made a note of the numbers and counting within the story. We then made an anchor chart to display math vocabulary words. The students needed to understand why we needed these math concepts during the reading lesson. I modeled a few examples of the math stories. After reading the story, we generated math stories as a group, and an example is shown (Appendix A). The on-grade

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture