6009 - Week 8.docx - Week 8 Qualitative Methods for Program...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages.

Week 8: Qualitative Methods for Program Evaluation 8.2 Individual Interviewing The Spectrum of Interviewing Methods ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Structured interviews Focused or semi-structured interviews Unstructured interviews Standardized interviews In-depth interviews In-depth interviews Survey interviews Survey interviews Clinical interviews Clinical history taking Group interviews Group interviews Life history In-Depth Interviews An exchange between one interviewer and one respondent “conversational partnership”; “conversation with a purpose” Encourage the respondent to take an active role in determining the flow and direction of discussion Conversation generates empirical data by enabling respondents to talk freely Requires mental agility, sensitivity, and practice Guided by a few broad topics, rather than a detailed questionnaire Ways to create structure without compromising the open exchange that is the hallmark of qualitative interviewing 8.3 Good Interviews and Bad Interviews, Part 1 Roleplay: Overview Rajiv (respondent): husband whose wife has just delivered a baby in Ethiopia Sangeeta (researcher): attempting in-depth interview to teach secure birth plan to father 8.4 Good Interviews and Bad Interviews, Part 2 8.5 Good Interviews and Bad Interviews, Part 3 First Interview: Recap Interviewee giving one word answers Interviewee stubbornly unresponsive Rapport lacking between interviewer and interviewee Second Interview: Recap Interviewee providing excellent information Interviewer not responsive Third Interview: Recap Interviewer very interactive Interviewee providing insightful information 8.6 Qualitative Data Collection: Group Interviewing
Week 8: Qualitative Methods for Program Evaluation Group Interviewing Focus Groups “A focus group is the use of group interaction to produce data and in sights that would be less accessible without the interaction found in a group .” –Morgan (1988) Types of Group Interviewing Natural groups: groups of people who preexist the research interview o For example, households, workplace, micro-credit members Community interviews: a participatory method meant to encourage active participation by community members o Empower participants For example, villages, slum areas—beneficiaries Consensus panels: specifically used to reach agreement o Sometimes used to facilitate agreement For example, Delphi, nominal Focus groups Group Interviewing Mixes observation and interviewing Overlaps with individual interviewing (more) and with participant observation (less) Opportunity to gather data on interactions, group dynamics, and “natural” vocabulary Less emphasis on interaction between researcher and participant and more on that among participants Strengths Weaknesses Good for accessing cultural norms and standards Not as good for exploring marginalized, less acceptable views Good for data on whats and whys— for interpreting descriptive statistics Hierarchies and social dominance can be intensified Good for generating hypotheses

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture