lecture 20 - Thermal and Fluids Engineering I Lecture 20...

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Thermal and Fluids Engineering I Lecture 20 Page 1 Lecture 20 – Drag and Lift Drag on Blunt Bodies For many shapes, the drag coefficient is insensitive to Reynolds number as long as the Reynolds number is large enough. For example, in Fig 10-10, The drag coefficient is not a strong function of Reynolds number for a cylinder or sphere if 35 10 2 10 Re << × . As an example of a blunt body, consider the flow over a rectangular bar with sharp corners
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Thermal and Fluids Engineering I Lecture 20 Page 2 Table 10-1 gives drag coefficients for this shape if 4 10 Re> . Tables 10-1 through 10-3 give drag coefficients for many two and three dimensional objects, including vehicles. Drag on Composite Bodies As an approximation, the drag on a composite body equals the drag on each individual component of the body. For example, consider a water tower In reality, there is some interference between the flow over the sphere and that over the cylinder, but the effect of this interference is often negligible.
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lecture 20 - Thermal and Fluids Engineering I Lecture 20...

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