Topic No.09-Humanistic Perspectives on Personality Development.pptx

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Humanistic Perspectiveson PersonalityDevelopmentBy:- Israr K. Raja
Humanistic Perspectives onPersonality DevelopmentAfter discussing the Cognitive, Psychosexual, Psychosocialand Moral prospective on Personality development.Today we are going to discuss the Humanistic prospectiveon personality development.
Maslow and Carl were the mainProponents of Humanistic prospective
Maslow’s Humanistic Theory ofPersonalityMaslow’s humanistic theory of personalitystates thatpeople achieve their fullpotential by moving frombasic needs toself-actualization.
Maslow’s Humanistic Theory ofPersonalityMaslow expanded the field of humanistic psychology toinclude an explanation of how human needs changethroughout an individual’s lifespan, and how theseneedsinfluencethe development of personality.Maslow’s hierarchy of needs ranks human needs from themost basic physical needs to the most advanced needs of self-actualization.A person must acquire and master (fully satisfied and fulfilled)each level of need before proceeding to the next need.Maslow studied the personalities of self-actualizers and foundthey had many things in common; he believed self-actualizersindicate acoherent personality syndromeand representoptimal psychological health and functioning.
Maslow’s Humanistic Theory ofPersonalityMaslow studied the personalities of peoplewho he considered to be healthy, creative,and productive.He found that such people share similarcharacteristics, such as being open, creative,loving, spontaneous, compassionate,concerned for others, and accepting ofthemselves.
Maslow’s HierarchyPyramidMaslow is perhaps most well-known for his hierarchy of needstheory, in which he proposes that human beings have certainneeds in common and that these needs must be met in acertain order.These needs range from the most basic physiological needs forsurvival to higher-level self-actualization and transcendenceneeds.Maslow’s hierarchy is most often presented visually as apyramid, with the largest, most fundamental physiologicalneeds at the bottom and the smallest, most advanced self-actualization needs at the top.Each layer of the pyramid must be fulfilled before moving upthe pyramid to higher needs, and this process is continuedthroughout the lifespan
Traits of Personality according to Needs
Needs and Personality DevelopmentMaslow believed that successful fulfilment of eachlayer of needs was vital in the development ofpersonality.

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Term
Spring
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N/A
Tags
Psychology, Today

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