08bColorTheory

08bColorTheory - GO 104 Color Theory(171m aidCdor Thea-y...

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Unformatted text preview: GO 104 - Color Theory .. (171m aidCdor Thea-y Color Fundamentals - Visual Perception - Additive Color Systems - Subtract ive Color System s - Colo rCo mmun ication .. (hin- dednr Timmy Elli ll‘ Flllllialll Ellal 8: il sual PB": Ellii 0|] Thevisible spect m m ranges from ap prox. 400nm in theblue region to 700nm in the red region - Thehumaneye can‘tpercelVeenergyoutslde lhl: range People wh 0 can‘t d istingu ish between primary colors within this ran ge are referred to as colo rdeficient - 81010%ofthemalepupulaflonIscololdeflclent - Onlym of1 %of1hefemalepopulaton Iscolordeflcrenz .. G711:- dedor Thea-y Elli ll‘ Flllltlalll erlal 3: il sual Perl: Ellli 0|] Color Perception i s Subjective - Th ecolorswe see are a result of our brain’s interp retaion ofthe stimulus perceived by therods and con es in our eyes. — Rods :A type ne rve ending h the ey ethat 5 se rsrtlve to bw leve S oflbht. Res [DIS ble for nigh visim. — Cones: Aty re ofnervee m'ng in theeye tlutcan d'stingu's h betwee nthe individual c unponents d ligit. The abirty to d'sthguish betweenthe indiv'uial components of the I It creates the se rsatnn wecall cobr. lfy on d no c mes In you ey es, no color. 02/10/2003 Chla- am Cdor Thea-y Elli ll Fumlam erlal S: “ sual PE": Ellii 0|] Visible lig ht is th e portio n of t he elect romagnetic spectrum which the hu man eye is sen sitiveto. Th is visible spect m m is located near th ecen ter of th e elect ro magnetic sp ect rum. mm mrl adormmy Elli ll‘ Fumlam Ellal 8: il sual Fell} Bllli 0|‘l Visible Light & Color Perception - Using a prism to dissect an “ideal“ white ligh t. the perceived result is a visu al sen sat ion we have been tau ght to call red,g reen an d blu e. - All thecolor you see is made up 0 fcombination s of red. green & blue light. RG B we the primary co lors of In ht. Gala- md Cdor Thou-y Bill ll‘ Flllllialll erlal s: il sual I'm Ellli 0|] Color Perception i s Subjective - All th eco ne in all of oureyes do not h avet he same sensiti ity. We all see colo rd ifferently. - Theco lor perceived is a result of the object, the illuminant, and t he sensor (our eyes and brain). We all interp ret the colo rin formatio n differently based u pon 0 ur perso nal experiences. GO 104 - Color Theory Chla- dedor Thea-y flfll ll“ Fundam Ellal 8: ll sual PE": Ellll IJII All people involved in the color reproduction proces 5 should take a colo r deficie ncy te st 1. Productio n Pa) pie 2. Custo mer Service Representatives 3. Sales Personnel 4. Client (The clientiithe oo lor expert!) (hlrr aidCdanhnrry llllllilllle Boll! lllllllllll By exciting the red, green, and bl: e sensitive con es, any co lo rcan be prod used by adding to geth er th e th ree additive primariesl R.G,Bl . Fo rexamp le w hen blu e an d green light s overhp , the blu ean d green cones are illuminated, we perceive th ecolor cyan. _ _ G711:- dedorTheu-y The Mdilive color Svslnm Examples of ad ditive color system include: - CobrMonitas - Television - Stage lighting - A pqectionTV 02/10/2003 .. Chla- md CdorThecry Bol ll lllilllllll The re are two ways to cortrol how much red. green, and blue light reaches the eye: Additive Mixing: Starting with black varying n amounts ofred, green, and blue light are ‘added’ to f0 im an image. Subtractive Mixi m:Stait ing wth white varying amo unts of red , green, and blue light are ‘subtracted‘ from an image. .. lllllllllve EDI II‘ M iiian Chla- mrl Cdnrmmy gree n + DIUE = Cyan red + blue = magen la “Ed ‘t gre en = red 4 gre en + blu e=w hite Th eA dditive Colo r System Black (- R.— G.— B.) lllllllllil GO 104 - Color Theory . (171m aidCdor Thea-y The sum mtive color Svs tern Assumption sfor Su btractive Colo r Systems: White substrate (or pa per) Is u sed — Pepe rrefle CS all red gree n, an d blue | Ight All the colo rthere fore, IS In the pape r. Th e pape rlsthe maln co rm onen ttnatd ee rm nes 111 e color gamut Ftocess Inks (CMYK) a re se m-ta nsparen t — Each ln kab sorbs ~1/3 of the VlSlb Ie spectrum cyan subtracts re d,transmlts g reen and b lue mage nta su blra CB green , transmlts reda nd blu e yellow subtracts b lue. tran smls red an dg reen. 02/10/2 om A31 1! M (hlrr dednr Timmy Sulltr active Baler Illivi In Subtract ive m ixin g starts with wh ite light (RGB) reflected bvthe substrate and subtracts the unwanted compo nent s of RG B using cyan, magenta, and yellow colorants. cyan co oran rrr agenta col orant yell ow colorant “mi nus red” “mi nus green" “mi nus hlu é' . G711:- dedor Thea-y Suhlr active Bclcr Illivi Ill Mixing CMY colorants d oesn’t alw ay; yield g ood neutral g rays or dark enou gh shad ows. Adding black allow 5 more aocu rate grays, and conserves the m oreexpen siveCMY colorant s aid prod uces darker shado ws. 02/10/2003 Th e Subtractive Color System White (R. G.+B) mm mrl Cdnrmmy Sllllll‘ active Bel or Mixing Each colorant ab sorbs approximately US and transmits a) proximately 2/3 of whitelig ht. All colors are made by varyin g th e am ount of colorant in each layer. Cyan + Magenh + V d In w = Black Gala- md Cdor Thou-y 90' II‘ I: III] III "Hill at one Evaluai on Even with limits of print systems. the problem is often not our ability to reproduce colo r, but ou rabilityto effectively communicate it. Th ere are many var-b les in the colo r evaluation and colo r com mun icat ion process. GO 104 - Color Theory . (171m aidCdor Thea-y 00' II‘ 0 III] III lll‘liG ai 0|‘l& Evaluai 0|‘l lfwe could eliminate al ofth evariables in th e co lor evaluation/commu nication process, our ability to effectivelyco mmun icae color wo uld be sup erb. Printers and custo mers often use different langu age to d escribe tone and co lor issu es: “Hat, Dirty , me , Brigner, Maesnap, T00 Warm, T00 Cold, C ba mr, Mae alts, Pop, Too We ak, Too Hea vy, Make ltJump OffThe Page." . (hin- dedanhnrry 00' II‘ Evaluai IJI'I Theco lor we see is d etermined byt he interaction of lig htwith the obiect and our senses. Different light sources em it different spectral energy and co lorsap pear different. 2800 Kelvin 5000 KeIVI n 7500 Kelvin Chla- am Cdor Thea-y 00' II‘ 0 III] III lll‘liG 3' Mia Ellalllfli [III Customer: “I ain’t tellyou w hat lwant until I see it.” Precisely match ing a custo mer's o rig inal may not wh at th a] want (even if it was what they first requested ). Often times,t he proof becomes the new original. To aid color communication , evalu Kim 0 f proof 5 mu st be don e under stan dard condiions. _ mm mrl Cdnrmmy 00' ll‘ Emil "ill on Lig ht sou rces are describ ed by spectral pow er distribu tions; a measure of power emitted at each wavelength. While human 5 adaptto each illuminant. a good qu alitv whit e liq ht con tains energy across the spectrum. m m ndcsccn l (c E A do lrght (c E DES) flum csccnl mlafi \e spectral pover disn'i lution . G711:- dedor Thea-y flfllll‘ EVEIIIIEI'OI‘I Colo rVie n g SJecifications are used b V th eG raphic Arts Ind ustry to redu oe the variables in the evaluation of co lor. Colo rViewin g a) ecifications in all de: Ligh ting - 5000 Kelvin ( D5000) Surround - Munsell NI8 02/10/2003 Gala- md Cdor Thou-y 00' ll“ Ellalllfli 0|] Bot h th eo verh ead and tran sparency viewer are D5000. Bulb 5 m ust b e chang ed regularly. ...—. .— Cou my 9! an (Gray in: Te crm m ay Inc mm a ted] GO 104 - Color Theory (171m aidCdor Thea-y Chla- am Cdor Thea-y BDIII‘TIIHJW As se 55 me nt Que stions: Knowledge - To the student: These questbns a re designed for you to test you' k mwledge a m umerstandng ofthe sub; ct matte rcolered, as a n aid toyou’ lear ring pure :5. A.Whatthree items must be pres entiorcdorto exist? B. Whata re the primary c dorsof Ight? C. Whata re the primary a ml 5 ecordary c dasof the addtive and sunractive cdor syste m? D.Whatis the most important ele mentin cola re production thatdeterm hes the c clor gamut? E.Whatis the surround a ml lighthg spec iications for prqaer color evallation ii lhe Gaphc Arts Incllstry? 02/10/2003 ...
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