hist_II_1_22_08

hist_II_1_22_08 - Music History II New York University Dr....

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1 Music History II New York University Dr. Thomas MacFarlane 1st Quote of the day (1/22/08) Reviewing where we’ve been…
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2 Syllabus Quote of the Day Gutenberg Transitions: Late Renaissance / Mannerism Baroque… Theory of the Affects Moneteverdi (part 1) Agenda (1/22/08) Agenda (1/22/08)
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3 Johann Gensfleisch zum Gutenberg Johann Gensfleisch zum Gutenberg (born between 1394 and 1399,) a Mainz goldsmith of a patrician family, began experimenting with printing work towards 1440 when he was a political exile. Before Gutenberg there were only about 30,000 books in Europe. By 1500, there were more than 9,000,000. 2. There are, however, several popular misconceptions concerning Gutenberg’s actual contribution. Gutenberg (cont’d) Gutenberg was not the first to grasp the need for, and the potentialities of large-scale print. His invention was prompted largely by the fact that the multiplication of texts was not only a general want but had also, by the middle of the 15 th century, become a recognized and lucrative trade. Printing from a negative relief surface was not a new invention. The Chinese had practiced it for about a thousand years (the legendary date of its inception is A.D. 594), and their method of hammering or rubbing off impressions from a wood-block had spread along the caravan routes to the west, where block-prints and block- books expressive of popular piety were well known at the time of Gutenberg.
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4 So, what changed? Everything!
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5 Eye Ear Left Hemisphere (Controls right side of body) Right Hemisphere (Controls left side of body) Visual-Speech-Verbal Tactile-Spatial-Musical-Acoustic Logical, Mathematical Holistic Linear, Detailed Artistic, Symbolic Sequential Simultaneous Controlled Emotional Intellectual Intuitive, Creative Dominant Minor, Quiet Worldly Spiritual Quantitative Qualitative Functions of the Human Brain Gregorian Chant - Mass for Christmas Day • Figure? • Ground? Eno…
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6 Music of the Late Renaissance -- 1560-1600 • The triad reigns supreme. • Tonality with its I/IV/V functions becomes firmly established. • Dissonance becomes more highly exploited. • Dialogue and echo effects become standard. Thomas Morley 1557-1602 Served the court of Elizabeth I and was organist at St. Paul's Cathedral Best known for his balletts -- part songs with fa-la-la refrains It Was A Lover And His Lass
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7 John Dowland 1562-1626 Lutenist to Elizabeth I , James I and several noble households in England Famous for his solo lute music and lute ayres (solo songs with lute accompaniment -- almost always strophic, i.e., having several stanzas) Often melancholy texts -- his motto was "Semper Dowland, semper dolens" ("Ever Dowland, ever doleful") In Darkness Let Me Dwell William Shakespeare (1564?-1610) English playwright and poet considered by many scholars to be the greatest writer in history. (He is the only author to have ALL of his works included in Encyclopedia Britannica's "Great Books of the Western World.") Shakespeare, still the world's most popular playwright, dwells at the summit of human achievement with the likes of Aristotle, Michelangelo, Bach and Newton.
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course MUSIC E85 taught by Professor Macfarlane during the Spring '08 term at NYU.

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hist_II_1_22_08 - Music History II New York University Dr....

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