Statistics 7.2

Statistics 7.2 - 7-2 Basics of Hypothesis Testing...

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7-2 Basics of Hypothesis Testing Definitions In statistics, a hypothesis is a claim or statement about a property of a population. A hypothesis test (or test of significance) is a standard procedure for testing a claim about a property of a population. Rare Event Rule If, under a given assumption, the probability of a particular observed event is exceptionally small, we conclude that the assumption is probably not correct. Components of a Formal Hypothesis Test The null hypothesis (denoted by ) is a statement that the value of a population parameter (such as proportion, or mean) is equal to some claimed value. 0 H For example, 0 : 0.5 Hp = 0 : 98.6 H μ = The alternative hypothesis (denoted by ) is the statement that the parameter has a value that somehow differs from the null hypothesis. 1 H For example, Proportions: 1 :0 . > 5 5 1 . < 1 . 5 Means: 1 :9 8 . 6 H > 1 8 . H 6 1 : 98.6 H < Example Identify the null and alternative hypotheses for the following statements: a. The proportion of drivers who admit to running red lights is greater than 0.5. 0 H : 1 H : b. The mean height of basketball players is at most 7 ft. 0 H : 1 H : Introduction to Statistics page 1 of 6 Chapter 7-2 Notes
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Definition The test statistic is a value computed from the sample data, and it is used in making the decision about the rejection of the null hypothesis.
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course MAT 143 taught by Professor Stone during the Spring '07 term at North Shore.

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Statistics 7.2 - 7-2 Basics of Hypothesis Testing...

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