Using your calculator for a 1-hypothesis test

Using your calculator for a 1-hypothesis test - Hypothesis...

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Hypothesis Testing for a Population Proportion Example Of 880 randomly selected drivers, 56% admitted that they run red lights. Test the claim that the majority (more than half) of all Americans run red lights. Use the traditional method, P-value method, and Confidence Interval Method to test this claim: More than half (of all Americans) admit to running red lights. That is, 0.5 p > . Assume that the significance level is 0.05 α = . Solution We first state our hypotheses: 0 1 : 0.5 : 0.5 H p H p = > Our alternative hypothesis states the claim that a majority of Americans admit to running red lights. It is important to state that we are testing a claim about a population proportion . We will be using a right-sided hypothesis test since we have a ‘greater than’ statement in our inequality. Traditional Method We can use our calculator to calculate the test statistic. Because our significance level is 0.05, our critical value will be /2 z = 1.64. If our test statistic is greater than 1.64, we will
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course MAT 143 taught by Professor Stone during the Spring '07 term at North Shore Community College.

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Using your calculator for a 1-hypothesis test - Hypothesis...

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