psych2 - October 29, 2007 Psychology 113 Professor Singh...

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October 29, 2007 Psychology 113 Professor Singh Judgment Making There are many different things in our lives that influence our thought processes, thus influencing our judgment making. Everyday we make judgments without even realizing it, by following our senses; we make decisions such as ‘should I wear a coat today?’ One such way in which we judge things is called the availability heuristic. This controls how we base our judgments by the information that is mentally available. When instances of an event are easily available, they will come to mind more quickly and with little effort. Anything that will help ease retrieving information can increase its perceived availability. Many features enable information to “pop into mind.” These include how recently you’ve heard about it, its distinctiveness, and its concreteness. Overconfidence is another way in which we form judgments. With overconfidence people have tendencies to overestimate the accuracy and amount of knowledge. The text book cites examples in which people were asked a question and the
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psych2 - October 29, 2007 Psychology 113 Professor Singh...

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