Kant on Happiness - Philosophy Essay - Stevens 1 Leanne...

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Stevens 1 Leanne Stevens Kant on Happiness Philosophy 1320, fall 2013, 329 words Kant on Happiness Kant describes happiness as the satisfaction of all inclinations associated with the welfare of a person’s self. He defines the word inclinations as a being’s desires (Kant 12). These desires are instinctive and generated by the body’s needs and wants. These inclinations are often times not in accord with one’s duty. Kant argues that happiness is not the purpose of life. Fulfilling one’s duty is described as the purpose of life according to Kant regardless of one’s desires. His argument is that if everyone focused on happiness as their sole purpose and acted accordingly, people would not be better off well-being wise as our inclinations for happiness are not always in our best interest. He notes happiness as a duty that is to be served indirectly. The idea is that a being should not seek to be happy for the result of self-satisfaction in accord with the want of happiness. Maintaining the

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