Essay 1 - Elizabeth Doud Anthropology TA Heidi Klomp Section 13 Simple Quiz#3 Part 1 From the crowded cities of America to the sparse deserts of Africa

Essay 1 - Elizabeth Doud Anthropology TA Heidi Klomp...

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Elizabeth Doud Anthropology TA: Heidi Klomp Section 13 Simple Quiz #3 – Part 1 From the crowded cities of America to the sparse deserts of Africa, it can sometimes be difficult to see any similarities between the people who live in completely different cultures. And while it is true that no two people or cultures are the same, underneath the individual thoughts and beliefs there is a similarity that goes far beyond any differences that exist among humans. This is seen in the aspects of human life that are the same throughout the world. The connection of family and kinship, the creation of societies, the ever changing nature of society as a whole, man's tendency to be conflicted between society and his own ideas, and his search for ways to explain the world are universal to all mankind, growing from the human being's social nature and his ability to learn and adapt. As we look at the different cultures across the world, it is quite easy to see “that the family. . . is the primary unit of society” (Crandall, Introduction 40). The general definition and make-up of a 'family' may differ somewhat from culture to culture, as seen in the “Bushmen roam[ing] about together in small family bands” (Thomas 11) while the average modern American family consists of a mother, father and children living together. These families are created so that every human being may feel the “feelings of belonging, of attachment, of that murky, nebulous, virtually impossible to describe sensation of being part of a family, of feeling that one is bonded to this person or to these persons in a manner that may be stronger than any other kind of human bond” (Crandall, Introduction 40). This is what a mother feels upon giving birth to a child, and what father feels as he watches his son grow to adulthood, and it is because
of the universal need to belong, the universal longing to know these indescribable feelings that humans gather together into family groups, introducing new members through marriage and forging bonds that allow a society to survive. As society expands to include more than one family, the people must be bound together by more than just the feelings of kinship that have kept the individual families from falling apart.

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