UWS Biodiversity Practical 3 Microorganisms 2014 - 300802...

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300802 BIODIVERSITY EUKARYOTIC AND PROKARYOTIC MICROORGANISMS PRACTICAL 3 AUTUMN SEMESTER 2014 You MUST bring a printed copy of these notes to the class so that you can hand in the material for assessment. You may wish to bring your textbook to this practical class. STUDENT No. _________________________________ NAME: _______________________________________ You must wear safety goggles during this practical. Dr Michelle Moffitt and Dr Tony Haigh SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND HEALTH
University of Western Sydney 2014 300802 Biodiversity Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Microorganisms43 Practical Manual EUKARYOTIC AND PROKARYOTIC MICROORGANISMS Background reading Mason KA, Losos AB, Singer SR, Raven PH, Johnson GB 2014 Biology, 10th ed. McGraw-Hill, New York.Chapter 28 Prokaryotes Chapter 29 Protists Chapter 31 Fungi At the completion of this Practical you should be able to: Identify the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms Observe structural features of the protist ParameciumIdentify the major structural features of fungi Observe Bacteria and identify the various nutritional types 3.1 Introduction In this practical, we will observe microorganisms and the defining features that are used in their identification. All organisms can be classified into three domains of life, Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea. All Bacteria and Archaea are microscopic, prokaryotic organisms which are generally unicellular. They play important roles in most ecosystems, many recycle nutrients, convert CO2into organic material (while simultaneously producing oxygen) and provide food for organisms in the higher trophic (feeding) levels. The domain Eukarya includes both microscopic and macroscopic organisms, which are made up of eukaryotic cells. Eukarya consists of four kingdoms, Animalia, Plantae, Fungi and Protista. As you will learn from lectures, Protista is not a true kingdom, rather a collection of eukaryotic organisms that do not fit into any of the other kingdoms. To learn more about the prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and kingdoms Fungi and Protista, you will observe them microscopically. You will learn to identify important features which are useful in identifying each group. You will also look at examples of the different nutritional types of Bacteria. You will be working with microbial cultures, you must wear safety goggles at all times during this practical class.You must hand in these notes for assessment.
University of Western Sydney 2014 300802 Biodiversity Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Microorganisms44 Practical Manual 3.2 Observing eukaryotic Protista Protista are a collection of eukaryotic microorganisms that do not belong in the kingdoms Plantae, Animalia or Fungi. They are a diverse group of organisms which display different methods of movement, may or may not be photosynthetic and are found in a wide range of ecosystems. Here we will look at an example of a protist, Paramecium.

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