HIST 201 1st Test 4 Notes - Presidential Election of 1852 Franklin Pierce won Uncle Toms Cabin was published in 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe authored it

HIST 201 1st Test 4 Notes - Presidential Election of 1852...

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Presidential Election of 1852 Franklin Pierce won. Uncle Tom’s Cabin was published in 1852. Harriet Beecher Stowe authored it. Pierce was an expansionist. This got him in trouble with the anti-slavery crusade. The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 Stephen Douglas from Illinois conceived it because he wanted a transcontinental RR through Illinois. The act created two new territories, Kansas and Nebraska and slavery would be decided by popular sovereignty. (By the people) -Kansas would be the first test of popular sovereignty. 8,000 people voted in the election to decide on a pro slavery or free soil legislature. There were only 2,000 eligible voters and pro slave won. Free soilers were mad because the election was marked by fraud and violence. They formed their own separate illegal legislature known as the Topeka Legislature. Pierce branded the free soil legislature illegal and accused the free soilers of treason. A mini civil war began in Kansas. John Brown killed people in a pro slavery settlement at Pottawatomie Creek. Pro slavery posse killed free soilers in Lawrence, Kansas. The events in KS caused a storm of controversy in Washington Senator Charles Sumner of MA launched a verbal attack on the South and Senator Butler of S.C. Preston Brooks viciously assaulted Sumner. He was Butler’s relative. Bleeding Kansas had the entire nation excited in a presidential election year. PRESIDENT JAMES BUCHANAN AND FOUR MORE YEARS OF STRIFE In 1856, the Democratic Party denied Franklin Pierce the nomination because the inept President had too closely associated himself with the pro-slavery faction in Kansas In his place, they nominated James Buchanan of Pennsylvania. Buchanan, a moderate on the slavery issue was, nonetheless, popular in the South and a veteran of party politics. That he lacked the inner strength to be President mattered little; Buchanan could win the election. The major opposition to Buchanan did not come from the Whigs; that party suffered defections in both the North and the South and in 1856 had support only in the border states of the upper South. The greatest challenge to the Democrats in this election came from a new political party, the Republican Party. Only two years old, the Republicans nominated the famous – and ambitious - John C. Fremont. The Republicans did not expect to win in 1856, but Fremont ran a surprisingly strong race and finished second to Buchanan. Almost all of the Republican votes came from the northern section of the nation. Buchanan proved to be the wrong man in the wrong place at the wrong time. Shortly after he became President, the Dred Scott decision, in which the Court ruled that Dred Scot was not a citizen,
therefore he couldn't sue for his freedom. What the decision did was to make more likely a violent resolution of the slavery question. The bloodletting continued in Kansas, and Buchanan followed the footsteps of Pierce by backing the pro-slavery side. The violence was not confined to Kansas.

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