Transpiration Lab - INVeStIGatIoN 11 Transpiration What factors including environmental variables affect the rate of transpiration in plants BACkground

Transpiration Lab - INVeStIGatIoN 11 Transpiration What...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 12 pages.

INVeStIGatIoN 11 Transpiration What factors, including environmental variables, affect the rate of transpiration in plants? BACkground Cells and organisms must exchange matter with the environment to grow, reproduce,  and maintain organization, and the availability of resources influences responses and  activities. For example, water and macronutrients are used to synthesize new molecules,  and, in plants, water is essential for photosynthesis. Organisms have evolved various  mechanisms for accumulating sufficient quantities of water, ions, and other nutrients and  for keeping them properly balanced to maintain homeostasis.  Plants absorb and transport water, nutrients, and ions from the surrounding soil  via osmosis, diffusion, and active transport. Once water and dissolved nutrients have  entered the root xylem, they are transported upward to the stems and leaves as part of  the process of transpiration, with a subsequent loss of water due to evaporation from the  leaf surface. Too much water loss can be detrimental to plants; they can wilt and die.  The transport of water upward from roots to shoots in the xylem is governed by  differences in water (or osmotic) potential, with water molecules moving from an area  of high water potential (higher free energy, more water) to an area of low water potential  (lower free energy, less water). (You may have studied the concept of water potential in  more detail when exploring the processes of osmosis and diffusion in Investigation 4  in this manual.) The movement of water through a plant is facilitated by osmosis, root  pressure, and the physical and chemical properties of water. Transpiration creates a lower  osmotic potential in the leaf, and the TACT (transpiration, adhesion, cohesion, and  tension) mechanism describes the forces that move water and dissolved nutrients up the  xylem.  Investigation 11 S135
Image of page 1
l During transpiration, water evaporating from the spaces within leaves escapes through small pores called  stomata. Although evaporation of water through open stomata is a major route of water loss in plants, the  stomata must open to allow for the entry of CO used in photosynthesis. In addition, O 2  produced in  photosynthesis exits through open stomata. Consequently, a balance must be maintained between the  transport of CO 2  and O 2  and the loss of water. Specialized cells called guard cells help regulate the opening  and closing of stomata. In this laboratory investigation, you will begin by calculating leaf surface area and  then determine the average number of stomata per square millimeter. From your data, several questions 
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 12 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture