Weathering - Weathering Weathering, erosion, and...

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Weathering Weathering, erosion, and transportation Weathering refers to the destructive processes that change rock at the surface Erosion is the physical removal of rock {usually by water rivers or glaciers Once removed, the rock particles are transported away; by rivers, glaciers, wind, gravity…} Effects of weathering Differential weathering --some materials are more resistant than others Types of weathering Mechanical weathering breaks rocks into smaller pieces Frost wedging : water freezes in the cracks and expands Pressure release : As rock comes to surface it expands and cracks Other processes: Plant growth Frost heave {small ice crystals} Salt heave {salt crystals} Temperature change {fire or climate} can crack rock Chemical weathering decomposes rocks via chemical reactions Role of oxygen Oxygen is chemically active e.g., rust (iron+oxygen= iron oxide) Red color is the result of hematite--produced when air reacts with iron rich minerals Role of acid Acidic water is the most effective agent of chemical weathering
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Weathering - Weathering Weathering, erosion, and...

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