Chapter 7 Notes

Chapter 7 Notes - forces are those that the objects within...

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The impulse of a force is the product of the average force and the time interval t during which the force acts: . Impulse is a vector that points in the same direction as the average force. The linear momentum p of an object is the product of the object's mass m and velocity v , or p = m v . Linear momentum is a vector that points in the direction of the velocity. The total momentum of a system of objects is the vector sum of the momenta of the individual objects. The impulse–momentum theorem states that an impulse produces a change in an object's momentum, according to , where m v f is the final momentum and m v 0 is the initial momentum. The principle of conservation of linear momentum states that the total linear momentum of an isolated system remains constant. An isolated system is one for which the sum of the external forces acting on the system is zero. External forces are those that agents external to the system exert on objects within the system. In contrast, internal
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Unformatted text preview: forces are those that the objects within the system exert on each other. An elastic collision is one in which the total kinetic energy is the same before and after the collision. An inelastic collision is one in which the total kinetic energy is not the same before and after the collision. If the objects stick together after colliding, the collision is said to be completely inelastic. The location x cm of the center of mass of two objects lying on the x axis is given by where m 1 and m 2 are the masses of the objects, and x 1 and x 2 are their positions relative to the coordinate origin. If the objects move with velocities v 1 and v 2 , the velocity v cm of the center of mass is If the total linear momentum of a system of objects remains constant during an interaction such as a collision, the velocity of the center of mass also remains constant....
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course PHYS 101 taught by Professor Sharp during the Spring '08 term at Ohio State.

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