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(Go to File, Download As, then pick the format you want to use) Pass - santiago Module 7 – 7.01: The Great Society The Big Ideas Who were the “poor” in the 1950s and 1960s? What were their lives like? The African Americans, the MLJK were trying to solve this. Briefly describe the War on Poverty. The War on Poverty is the unofficial name for legislation first introduced by United States President Lyndon B. Johnson during his State of the Union address on Wednesday, January 8, 1964. What were the differences between conservatives and liberals in the 60s? Conservatives and libertarians supposedly agree with each other on economic issues, but disagree to some extent on social issues and foreign policy. This is generally accurate. Principled conservatives believe in limited government and free enterprise, so there is agreement on the economic side. And there is disagreement on social issues. What were the Great Society programs? The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. How did the Great Society programs impact Americans? 195 million Americans were affected by programs initiated by Johnson. Yet, the Great Society and Johnson's "War on Poverty" had their critics. ... Critics of the Great Society also charged that these programs just created bureaucracies and threw money at problems without producing results. What happened to the Great Society? Medicare and Medicaid continue to eat up a larger share of the federal budget every year, while other Great Society programs have mostly stayed small. The outsized spending on older Americans has contributed to a gradual shift in poverty away from the old and into younger age groups. How do the Great Society programs under Johnson compare to the New Deal programs started by Roosevelt? Great Society: A set of domestic programs in the United States launched by President Lyndon B Johnson in 1964-65. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. It attempted to move beyond the New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt and provide a variety of social programs to uplift the nation. Vocabulary · Civil rights legislation – legal protection for basic human rights and from discrimination of those rights based on physical or mental differences · Conservative – a political view favoring limited government size and expenditures and caution in making changes · Desegregation – ending the customary or enforced separation of ethnic or racial groups in
public places · Discrimination – unfair treatment of a person or group based on physical or mental characteristics · Disproportionate – unequal or out of proportion in quantity, shape, or size · Domestic policies – laws and programs that affect people within a country · Federal debt – the total amount of spending over budget of the national government over the years · Liberal – political view favoring government action & spending to improve society and embrace change · Migrant laborer –

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