Thurgood Marshall Supreme Leader Paper - 1 Thurgood Marshall Supreme Wielder of the Law and the Gavel Dr Glasker 2 During the Civil Rights movement

Thurgood Marshall Supreme Leader Paper - 1 Thurgood...

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1Thurgood Marshall: Supreme Wielder of the Law and the GavelDr. Glasker
2During the Civil Rights movement, there were a lot of African American leaders, trying to make a change to their society that truly resembled equality as best as humanly possible. Amongst those leaders were different ideologies. Some agreed with Dr. King and John Lewis in practicing civil disobedience. Others agreed with Malcolm X and the Black Panthers in the usageof any means necessary to gain their equal treatment. However, there was one individual who used the same rules that constricted the African Americans into a lesser state as the very reasons why they ought to be changed because they are impossible to change. This man would go on to break legal precedent and make the longest climb from being a humble waiter to the first black Supreme Court Justice; that man is Thurgood Marshall.In order to understand the raising of Thurgood Marshall, it is vital that one analyze his family roots. His whole bloodline combated Jim Crow laws, which his ancestors always found distaste, disgust, and rebelled against. His family had always lived in Baltimore, since the beginning of the Civil War (Juan Williams, Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary, New York, Three Rivers Press), 17). Considering its geographical location with regards to the United States, Baltimore was where the opinions of slavery clashed with each other, having abolitionistsand anti-abolitionists cohabiting one city.1His grandfather Isaiah Williams took part in the history making of Baltimore as a whole. Using his money earned from serving in the Union’s navy during the Civil War, Williams bought a house and “saw himself as the equal of anyone, attending church with whites and standing up for the rights of black people in the city.”2Thurgood Marshall’s family had been fighting racial discrimination two generations prior to his birth, beginning with the fight to end slavery.1 Juan Williams, Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary, 172 Williams, 18-19
3Thoroughgood Marshall was born on July 2, 1908 to Willie and Norma Marshall in Baltimore, Maryland with his older brother Aubrey. Willie was a sleeping-car porter, a group to be known for its anti-racism activities, while Norma was a housewife. Thoroughgood’s name is attributed to his ancestors Thorney Good and those prior to him who served under white masters whose surnames were some variation on Thoroughgood.3Despite the attempts of his elders to combat the on-growing discrimination, fear and bigotry dominated many of the minds of whites in Baltimore. “White fears of black political power led to efforts to intimidate blacks, and the year Thoroughgood was born eighty-nine (89) blacks were lynched nationally.”4However, the group of free blacks was able to find enough white allies to combat the attempts of segregationists to pass laws supporting the public separation of blacks and whites.5Despite his parents combating the discrimination in Baltimore, they wanted an uninterrupted childhood for

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