Essay 2 Fredrick Douglaus document on slavery - FREDRICK DOUGLASS ASKS WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY In the early eighteen hundreds slavery

Essay 2 Fredrick Douglaus document on slavery - FREDRICK...

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FREDRICK DOUGLASS ASKS “WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?” In the early eighteen hundreds slavery and oppression of black people was rampant. It was also a time when the American Revolution, Industrial revolution and the American Independence took place. Fredrick Douglass (1818-1895) was one of the most powerful and influential black Americans at that time, who made great social changes that, transformed the United States during the nineteenth century. He was born through slavery and rose from oppression. He became famous and is known internationally through his humanitarian efforts (Appelbaum, Douglass, 1995, 3). He also served as an author, newspaper editor, civil servant, diplomat and lecturer”. He was a reformer (Blessingame, Mackivigan, 5). Douglass, valued freedom more than anything and he escaped the harsh conditions of slavery as a young man and settled to the North where there was not much oppression as the south. Thereafter he was befriended by abolitionists and his destiny and quest for freedom prevailed. (Gomez, 1997)Douglass’ passion and zeal for black human rights and freedom brought his work to recognition and helped in the slavery abolition. One of his documents in an address that was delivered on July 5, 1852 holds great importance in history. His address contrasts the natural rights and freedom of the black people with the declaration of Independence on the fourth of July. Douglass shows why the fourth of July is not relevant to the African American People because of the history behind it. In the seventeenth and eighteenth century, the Americans had integrated slavery as part of the society in buying and selling of men, women and children. Most slaves sold in America were imported from Africa or the West Indies. In the mid eighteenth century the trade was made local and became an accepted operation that transported thousands of slaves annually from the upper to the lower south and transferred more slaves from one owner to another. This was

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