Review Questions Chapt 11

Review Questions Chapt 11 - hot blue stars 8 A star’s...

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SC404.01 March 5, 2008 Chapter 11 1. We can learn about the lives of the stars by seeing the difference in brightness. We talk about the bright stars in the sky which talk about the apparent brightness. It is the actual amount of power reaching us. We also talk about the luminosity which is the total amount of power that a star emits into space. 5. Spectral type is a way of classifying a star by the lines that appear in its spectrum; it is related to surface temperature. The basic spectral types are designated by a letter and are subdivided with numbers from 0-9. The hottest stars, with the bluest colors, are called spectral type O, followed in order of declining surface temperature by spectral types B, A, F, G, K, and M. The hottest stars of spectral are type O. The cool, red stars turn out to be much more common than
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Unformatted text preview: hot, blue stars. 8. A star’s radius can be calculated from its luminosity and surface temperature. Giants and supergiant are more luminous than the sun which tells us that they must be much larger in radius than the sun. The hotter stars emit much more light per unit surface area than cooler stars. A supergiant star such as Betelgeuse is 500 solar radii. The Aldebaran giant star is 30 solar radii. Main-sequence stars follow this simple relationship between mass, temperature, and luminosity. They do not hold for giants or supergiant. 9. White dwarfs are the stars near the lower left are smaller in radius and appear white in color because of their high temperatures. 13....
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