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models - Psychology 101 Health Psychology Announcements...

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1 Psychology 101 Health Psychology Professor David Sherman Class # 13 Health Behavior Change: Models Announcements Psych 101 webpage updated (thanks, Deb!) Next Tuesday, 2/26, two physicians (Dr. Mark Silverberg, pediatric ophthalmologist, and Dr. Mary Ferris, Medical Director, UCSB Student Health Services) will be guests in Psych 101 for class on doctor/patient communication – Come prepared with questions related to all areas of medical practice The Assumptions of Most Health Campaigns Information Attitude Change Behavior Change When is a message oversimplified? “To be safe, you must never have sex again without a condom” “As a sexually active adult there are many occasions during which you will probably have to use a condom to avoid transmission of HIV, and there are many others where you won’t.” Pros/Cons of more nuanced information Models of Health Behavior Change Health Belief Model Information Motivation Behavioral Skills Model Diffusion of Innovations Theory Stages of Change Theory Social Norms Approach Health Belief Model Performing a health behavior depends on: Belief that there is a health threat Your general health views Beliefs about vulnerability to threat Beliefs about severity of threat Belief that a behavior can reduce threat Belief that the behavior will work Belief that benefits of the behavior outweigh its risks
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2 Using Health Belief Model to Increase Mammography Use (Aiken, West et al., 1994) Women given intervention based on Health Belief Model: – Vulnerability – Severity Effectiveness of mammography Advantages of early detection Women in control group who were not given that information: Using Health Belief Model to Increase Mammography Use (Aiken, West et al., 1994) Women given intervention based on Health Belief Model: 30% had mammogram in next 3 months 50% in next 6 months Women in control group who were not given that information: 10% had mammogram in next 3 months 20% in next 6 months Evaluation of Health Belief Model • Strengths Includes useful constructs Focuses on people’s beliefs – it is a subjective model • Weaknesses Assumes behavior is rational Assumes people have the skills to alter behavior Ignores social context of many health behaviors Models of Health Behavior Change Health Belief Model
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