Autoethnography paper - Autoethnography Tia Sydnor SOC 304 Stephanie Byrd 1 Welcome to the Tia Sydnor Show Introduction Desmond Tutu a South African

Autoethnography paper - Autoethnography Tia Sydnor SOC 304...

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Autoethnography Tia SydnorSOC 304Stephanie Byrd12/6/20131
Welcome to the Tia Sydnor ShowIntroductionDesmond Tutu, a South African Anglican cleric who is known for his role in the obstruction of racial segregation in South Africa, once stated “you don't choose your family. They are God's gift to you, as you are to them.” (Desmond Tutu). With that beingsaid, I have always been fond of this one particular quote from Albert Einstein. He exclaimed “rejoice with your family in the beautiful land of life” (Quotations about family).I love my family infinitely, and I am very thankful for their role as a socializing agent in my life. My family, like all families has our moments of disrespect and annoyance to one another, but we share a very special bond that will never be broken. They have helped me in the development of my social identity and also with my class status as upper-middle. How does coming from a certain social class, concerted cultivation or natural growth, help me succeed as an African American female? Growing up, I was fully aware that my class standing was higher than that of most of my classmates. Being that I am of African American race, sometimes other looked down on my family because of our wealth and comfortable living styles. Belonging to the African American race, has its challenges, but I always try my best to overcome them. What are some constraints or entitlements I face belonging to this particular racial-ethnicity? All children of my color should feel the same way: My Black Is Beautiful! Do I resist this conformity or rejoice in it because it has always patterned my experiences and sense of self? I will discuss my conformity to being African American and how my social class gives my self-entitlement. 2
My name is Tia Sydnor and I graduated high school at the very young age of seventeen. I spent my entire first semester in college at this age while all of my friends and classmates were already eighteen and up. Being an African American, young female at this predominately white school, I knew I was very intelligent and that I could be successful at this collegiate level. At the age of seventeen, I graduated high school in the top 10% of my class. I knew if I strive hard enough, I could continue to be that stellar A/B student at CNU that I was in high school. BackgroundIn Annette Lareau’s articles Social Class and Childrearing in Black Families and White Families,her purpose is to address and look into social class differences and similarities in childrearing in black and white families.She wanted to look further into the mechanisms throughwhich parents transmit advantages are understood. An ethnographic data set of white and black children was taken to show the effects of social class on interactions inside the home. With this, Lareau directly addresses how middle-class parents engage in concerted cultivation while working-class and poor parents engage in the accomplishment of natural growth. This source

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