Ethics Essay.pdf - Virtues and Eudaimonia as seen through...

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Philosophy University Seminar Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics September 8, 2020 Virtues and Eudaimonia as seen through Nicomachean Ethics Human actions are driven by a particular purpose. What that purpose might be is up to each person's interpretation. Seen through the eyes of a renowned Greek philosopher known as Aristotle, the primary reason which guides human decision is happiness. In the books within Nicomachean Ethics , Aristotle plants an argument on what his own analysis of human behavior is—an argument which is teleological in nature. He approaches his writing reflecting upon the end goals. His books are based around the notion that every single human action or decision is directed towards some good, an evident conception, seeing as he begins his writing by saying "[e]very art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and pursuit, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim" (Aristotle, 3). According to his own writing, the highest goals and objectives are ends in themselves, whereas less prominent and relevant objectives are simply means to higher ends. He refers to this idea as "the good" and "the chief good". Further on, he goes on to state that it is a general consensus that this specific chief good must be happiness, but people remain in disagreement regarding what constitutes that happiness. Surely, what someone might consider "good" could be seen as incorrect from the perspective of another individual. Nonetheless, Aristotle's argument lies on the belief that actions seek good as an end, or at least, what is perceived as good by that individual. The reason behind Aristotle's statement is that humans essentially make decisions and act in ways that satisfy their emotions and therefore, bring them
happiness, or as Greeks refer to it, "eudaimonia". Throughout this essay, I will analyze Aristotle's argument and main points and discuss them in detail. I will speak on virtue as it relates to

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