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Chemistry: Applications of equilibrium constants: Predicting the direction of Reaction

Chemistry: Applications of equilibrium constants: Predicting the direction of Reaction

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Chemistry 121 2/26/2014 15.6 Applications of equilibrium constants: Predicting the direction of Reaction Consider the formation of NH 3 from N 2 and H 2 , 1 mol of N 2 and 2 mol of NH 3 in a 1-L container. How will the mixture react to reach equilibrium? N 2 (g) + 3 H 2 (g)  2NH 3 (g) [NH 3 ] 2 / [N 2 ][H 2 ] 3 = (2) 2 / (1)(2) 3 = 0.5 Whereas K c = 0.105 Q gives the same ratio the equilibrium expression gives, but for a system that is not at equilibrium. To calculate Q , one substitutes the initial concentrations on reactants and products into the equilibrium expression. If Q is lower than K then it means to increase K c If Q= K, the system si at Equilibrium If Q< K then the reaction forms a product At 448 degrees C the equilibrium constant K c for the reaction Is 50.5. Predict in which direction the reaction proceeds to reach equilibrium if we start with 2.0 x 10 -2 mol of HI, 1.0 x 10 -2 mol of H 2 , and 3.0 x 10 -2 of I 2 in a 2.00-L container.
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Because Q c < K c , the concentration of HI must increase and the concentrations of H 2 and I 2 must decrease to reach equilibrium; proceeds left to right to attain equilibrium.
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