Lecture 7 Site Formation and Excavation Fall 2007

Lecture 7 Site Formation and Excavation Fall 2007 -...

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SMU-in-Taos Open House February 14 (10am to 2pm) As a participant in the SMU-IN-TAOS program your experiences will be your classroom. Instead of reading about the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, you'll visit the site of the famous siege of Santa Fe. Rather than looking at pictures in a classroom, you will be taking the pictures. Archaeology comes alive as you excavate materials buried for millennia. You will be part of history on this historic campus. The SMU-IN-TAOS program offers both credit and non-credit courses in such disciplines as anthropology, geology, biology, art history, music, music history, photography, painting, sculpture, literature, and history. Additionally, the program offers a variety of wellness activities, including hiking, biking, river rafting, rock climbing, horseback riding, and fly fishing. Room 338 Blanton Building Clements Scholarship: Due March 4 http://www.smu.edu/taos/reginf.asp Also see: www.seiselt.com (for additional info)
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Community-based Archaeology at SMU-in-Taos At SMU-in-Taos, students are immersed in the living archaeology of the Ranchos de Taos Plaza. They participate in the annual mudding of the San Francisco de Asis every June Their hands are added to the centuries-long history of this church Not students
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Mrs. Lupita Tafoya They conduct professional excavations inside the homes and yards of the villagers And in their Dining Rooms and Backyards
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Predictive Modeling An archaeological predictive model is a tool that indicates the relative probability of encountering an archaeological site. 1. Geographic and environmental variables are recorded for existing sites and included in a GIS database. 2. Look for correspondences between individual variables and site location (statistical and spatial) models. 3. Each variable is given a value (or weight) indicating its relative importance in relation to site location. 4. These correspondences form the basis of predicting the locations of unknown sites given similar geographic and environmental variables. Predictive Models The underlying theoretical basis for such models is the hypothesis that environmental or some other predefined attributes can be correlated with archaeological site locations.
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Next Question: How well does the model perform, or how reliable is it? Ground Truthing through
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course ANTH 2363 taught by Professor Eiselt during the Spring '08 term at Southern Methodist.

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Lecture 7 Site Formation and Excavation Fall 2007 -...

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