ethics.docx - Ethical Principles Part I Four fundamental...

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Ethical Principles Part IFour fundamental ethical principlesThe Principle of Autonomyis Latin for "self-rule" We have an obligation to respect the autonomy of other persons, which is to respect the decisions made by other people concerning their own lives. This is also called the principle of human dignity. It gives us a negative duty not to interfere with the decisions of competent adults, and a positive duty to empower others for whom we’re responsible.Corollary principles: honesty in our dealings with others & obligation to keep promises. The Principle of Beneficence We have an obligation to bring about good in all our actions. Corollary principle? We must take positive steps to prevent harm. However, adopting this corollary principle frequently places us in direct conflict with respecting the autonomy of other persons.The Principle of Non-maleficence (It is not "non-malfeasance," which is a technical legal term, & it is not "non-malevolence," which means that one did not intend to harm.) We have an obligation not to harm others: "First, do no harm." Corollary principle: Where harm cannot be avoided, we are obligated to minimize
the harm we do. Corollary principle: Don't increase the risk of harm to others.Corollary principle: It is wrong to waste resources that could be used for good.Combining beneficence and non-maleficence: Each action must produce more good than harm. The Principle of justice We have an obligation to provide others with whatever they are owed or deserve.In public life, we have an obligation to treat all people equally, fairly, and impartially.Corollary principle: Impose no unfair burdens. Combining beneficence and justice: We are obligated to work for the benefit of those who are unfairly treated.Principle of Stewardship and other Ethical PrinciplesOTHER BASIC ETHICAL PRINCIPLES
1.StewardshipThis principle is grounded in the presupposition that God has absolute Dominion over creation, and that, insofar as human beings are made in God’s image and likeness(Imago Dei), we have been given a limited dominion over creation and are responsible for its care. The principle requires that the gifts of human life and its natural environment be used with profound respect for their intrinsic ends. Accordingly, simply because something can be done does not necessarily mean that itshouldbe done (the fallacy of the technological imperative). As applied to Catholic-sponsored health care, the principle of stewardship includes but is not reducible to concern for scarce resources; rather, it also implies a responsibility to see that the mission of Catholic health care is carried out as a ministry with its particular commitment to human dignity and the common good.2.Totality
These principles dictate that the well-being of the whole person must be taken into account in deciding about any therapeutic intervention or use of technology.In this context "integrity" refers to each individual’s duty to "preserve a view of the whole

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Term
Spring
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Tags
Test, Formal Cooperation, Immediate Material Cooperation

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