0134514211.pdf - Chapter 3 Rooms Division Learning...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 49 pages.

  101 C H A P T E R 3 Rooms Division LEARNING OBJECTIVES After reading and studying this chapter, you should be able to: Outline the duties and responsibilities of key executives and department heads. Draw an organizational chart of the rooms division of a hotel and identify the executive committee members. Describe the main functions of the rooms division departments. Describe property management systems and discuss yield management. Calculate occupancy percentages, average daily rates, and actual percentage of potential rooms revenue. Outline the importance of the reservations and guest services functions. List the complexities and challenges of the concierge, housekeeping, and security/loss prevention departments.
102 PART I Introducing Hospitality and Lodging This chapter examines the function of a hotel and the many departments that constitute a hotel. It also helps to explain why and how the departments are interdependent in successfully running a hotel. The Functions and Departments of a Hotel The primary function of a hotel is to provide lodging accommodation. A large hotel is run by a general manager (GM) and an executive committee that consists of the key executives who head the major departments: rooms division director, food and beverage (F&B) director, marketing and sales director, human resources director, chief accountant or controller, and chief engineer or facility manager. These executives generally have a regional or corporate counterpart with whom they have a reporting relationship, al- though the general manager is their immediate superior. A hotel is made up of several businesses or revenue centers and cost cen- ters . A few thousand products and services are sold every day. Each area of specialty requires dedication and a quality commitment for each department to get little things right all the time. Furthermore, hotels need the cooperation of a large and diverse group of people to perform well. James McManemon, the GM of the elegant Ritz-Carlton, Sarasota hotel, calls it “a business of details.” 1 Hotels are places of glamour that may be awe-inspiring. Even the experi- enced hotel person is impressed by the refined dignity of a beautiful hotel like a Ritz-Carlton or the artistic splendor of a Hyatt. The atmosphere of a hotel is stimulating to a hospitality student. Let us step into an imaginary hotel to feel the excitement and become a part of the rush that is similar to show business, for a hotel is live theater and the GM is the director of the cast of players. Hotels, whether they are chain affiliated or independent properties, exist to serve and enrich society and at the same time make a profit for the owners. Frequently, hotels are just like pieces of property on a Mo- nopoly board. They often make or lose more money with equity appreciation or deprecia- tion than through operations. Hotels have been described as “people palaces.” Some are cer- tainly palatial, and others are more functional.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture