Final Study Notes - Study Notes for 24-101 Fundamentals of...

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Unformatted text preview: Study Notes for 24-101 Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering Fall Semester, 2007 1. The Mechanical Engineering Profession (Chapter 1) 2. Problem Solving Skills (Chapter 2) • Unit systems : USCS – United States Customary System SI – International Systems of Units Base unit – fundamental quantity which can not be further broken down or expressed in terms of any simpler elements. Ex: kg (SI) and lb (USCS). Derived unit – quantity constructed as a combination of base units. Ex: m/s (SI) and ton {=2000 lb} (USCS) • Dimensional consistency The units associated with the quantities on each side of an equality sign must match. Also, if two terms in an equation are added or subtracted from one another, the units of the two quantities must be the same. – Unit conversions between USCS and SI systems. – Non-dimensional numbers. Ex.: Reynold’s number. Check if all units cancel out. • Significant digits and precision – Significant digit: a numerical value that is known to be correct and reliable in the light of inaccuracy that is present in the supplied information, any approximations that have been made along the way, and the mechanics of the calculation itself. – General rule: the last significant digit that you report in the answer to a problem should be of the same order of magnitude as the last significant digit that was supplied in the problem’s statement. – Precision: the precision of a number is half as large as the last significant digit used in expressing a number. This factor arises because the last digit represents the rounding-off process of the trailing digits. 3. Force systems (Chapter 3) You should be able to do the following: I. Describe a force in terms of its rectangular and polar components. II. Calculate the resultant of system of forces by using the vector algebra and polygon methods. III. Calculate the moment of a force about a point using perpendicular lever arm, a moment component, and vector cross product methods. IV. Concept of equilibrium and calculate unknown forces. Rectangular and Polar Coordinate a. Rectangular F = F x i + F y j Magnitude of F, F = sqrt(F x 2 + F y 2 ) Direction of F, θ = tan-1 (F y / F x ) b. Polar (F, θ ) Relates force’s magnitude and direction to its horizontal and vertical components...
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course MECHE 24-101 taught by Professor Leduc during the Fall '07 term at Carnegie Mellon.

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Final Study Notes - Study Notes for 24-101 Fundamentals of...

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