Nitrogen in Tires Research - Research Putting Nitrogen in...

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Research: Putting Nitrogen in Tires Research: To determine if it’s a good idea to pay money to put nitrogen in our tires, we need to learn about multiple factors using balloons. Tires are pretty much thick and bigger version of balloons that you blow up and drive on. By observing regular balloons, we learned about pressure, volume, temperature, and the number of moles. Pressure is the amount of force per square unit. Inside the balloon, the force is what gives the balloon a shape. The balloons that were filled with more gas particles had a higher pressure because more force was being pushed out, making those balloons harder to squeeze. The only thing is that if you only increase the volume and not the number of moles, then the pressure will decrease. So, we know that our tires need to have more gas particles if we want it to have a higher pressure. Volume, which is the amount of space an object takes up, will be what we use to determine how much air to put in our tires. Balloons that are bigger have a higher volume than smaller balloons. But, volume can be affected by temperature. Temperature is the measure of the average kinetic energy of a substance. We learned that when air is heated, the molecules expand, causing the volume to increase. If we put air that’s hot into our tires, then when it cools, the tires will deflate a little. Learning about the number of moles/particles of the air in the tire well also factor into which gas we use. Through the process of diffusion, which is the movement of particles from high to low concentration, particles can leave the balloon. But, the latex balloons lost air more quickly than the Mylar balloons. This told us that different materials hold air better than others, so we know that we need to buy a tire that doesn’t leak much air. Another way that the particles can leave the balloon/tire is through effusion, which is when molecules escape through a tiny opening when they’re under pressure. So, if we pump our tires up too much, and if we have a bad tire, we will lose even more air from the tire. Since balloons are very much like tires, we were able to personally experience
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