7 create three designs typically i produce three

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7. Create three designs Typically I produce three designs for a client to review. Make sure you have a good thorough conversation about what the needs and goals of the project are before you start on design. Also, it is helpful to show clients samples of different site designs before you begin. I often provide screen captures of other sites that might get the creative conversation going. 8. Present designs Most of my clients are located thousands of miles from me, so I am forced to present my designs over the phone and through e-mail. I typically do not just fire of an e-mail with a link to the new designs and wait for feedback. I setup a conference call and personally show the designs to the clients. This way I get to explain my vision for the design and how I see it working out for the rest of their site. This is even more important when you are showing comps for interactive media such as Flash. Your explanation is very important. I have found that clients can have a totally different view of a design without my explanation. My advice is to show your designs in
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< ´4 /> This book is supported by FITC, the design and technology events company. Check our website for a current list of our events. person or over the phone. Do not post the designs and shoot off an e-mail, because you are ask - ing for trouble. 9. Client modifies designs At this point the client makes tweaks, or in some cases, takes your design and runs it into the ground! But fear not, and remember that the client is always right. Be constantly aware that they are paying you. Some clients just need to have it their way. Some are controlling and want to play creative director. If the design looks terrible after they are finished tweaking, make sure you point out to them that you feel it could look better. However, at the end of the day they are paying for the project, so you will need to ensure they do actually like it. Just make sure to document your comments and suggestions. I always try to get my clients to focus on the target audience for every project. This way you can deflect their poor aesthetic tastes and try to bring some rationale to what you are doing. For in - stance, I had a client – lets call him “Larry”, who said, “I showed the Web site to my 17-year-old daughter, and she does not like the color and the fonts you are using.” I explained to Larry that the site was designed for older adults and his daughter did not represent the target audience. This answer helped him understand that we were trying to build a better site for his target audi - ence, and not for his daughter. Explaining your design decisions can help you avoid creative struggles with clients. I have big and small clients who do this sort of thing all the time. Just back up your ideas with solid answers and most clients will come around. If they do not and the Web site is not successful, then you can review your notes, and politely suggest in the future that they heed your warnings.
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  • Fall '09
  • Web Design, E-mail, World Wide Web, web site, FITC

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