In 2015 Kimberlé Crenshaw wrote Why Intersectionality Cant Wait to reclaim

In 2015 kimberlé crenshaw wrote why

This preview shows page 23 - 26 out of 55 pages.

In 2015, Kimberlé Crenshaw wrote “Why Intersectionality Can’t Wait” to reclaim intersectionality from its overly-broad usage within mainstream feminism and to refocus the
Image of page 23

Subscribe to view the full document.

20 theory on the socioeconomic well-being of Black women. “Because the intersectional experience is greater than the sum of racism and sexism, any analysis that does not take intersectionality into account cannot sufficiently address the particular manner in which Black women are subordinated” (Crenshaw). Her article reminds us of the reason she developed intersectionality theory and why she reclaims its original intent exposing intersectional erasure - Black women’s needs were not being met because there was no legal framework to provide recourse for the compound oppressions faced by Black women. And now, as intersectionality is within the mainstream of the feminist movement, Black women are still subjected to intersectional erasure as they experience inequitable health outcomes, and increased vulnerability to violence. Black feminist poet and essayist Audre Lorde reminds mainstream white feminists of the distinct endangerments faced by women of Color: “surely you know that for nonwhite women in this country, there is an 80 percent fatality rate from breast cancer; three times the number of unnecessary eventrations [sic], hysterectomies and sterilizations as for white women; three times as many chances of being raped, murdered, or assaulted as exist for white women.” (70). In a similar vein, Andrea Smith wrote in Conquest , published in 2005, that violence against women of Color cannot be analyzed through a single lens of patriarchy as it “serves as a tool of racism and colonialism” (1). Women of Color are systematically made vulnerable and the mainstream anti-violence movement often fails to adequately respond to such violence. The context for this gendered violence includes a neoliberal socioeconomic system of governance, poverty within communities of Color that are hyper-surveilled and subject to increasing police brutality, policies that allow police officers to commit violent crimes with impunity, policies that support violent
Image of page 24
21 gentrification of poor communities of Color, and policies that support the ongoing genocide of indigenous communities. While writing with Native women at the center of her analysis, Andrea Smith’s words are applicable to many other women of Color. She presents the idea that the colonizer has always used sexual violence as a tool of conquest. Smith writes: “where colonizers used sexual violence to eliminate Native populations, slave owners used rape to reproduce an exploitable labor force” (16). The effects of state-sponsored programs of colonization remain and are visible with the disproportionate levels of violence in Native and Black communities, for example, in the extent to which Native communities are affected by the prison system. Citing a 1996 study, Smith writes that “Native people are per capita the most arrested, most incarcerated, and most victimized by police brutality of any ethnic group in the country” (139). Neither Black nor
Image of page 25

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 26
  • Summer '19
  • Maria Yvonne Dy

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask ( soon) You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes