Out of pocket medical costs home revisions health insurance premiums and a

Out of pocket medical costs home revisions health

This preview shows page 25 - 28 out of 35 pages.

comorbidities, and no evidence of heart failure-related outpatient pharmacotherapy. Out of pocket medical costs, home revisions, health insurance premiums, and a number of other things that add up for the patient. Family Costs Many of the financial strains on the family go hand in hand with those financial burdens on the patient. A long-term commitment of time, energy, and money are all required of being a caregiver for a heart failure patient (American Heart Association, n.d.). Increased insurance premiums, out-of-pocket medical and medication costs, and other expenditures quickly add up and greatly impact the family paradigm. Lifestyle changes can impact disposable income and expenses, which can cause family members to give up their leisure time. Many patient’s change as the disease goes on, that the family members have take on more of the work. It is hard to put a
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HEART FAILURE 26 specific number on trying to determine how much heart failure costs because everything starts to add up. Community Costs Taxpayers in the community help pay for federal and state funded insurances for those who can’t. Examples of this are Medicare and Medicaid. Community costs associated with heart failure care are usually those who are unable to pay for medical expenses. According to data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), national healthcare expenditure grew to a 3.6 trillion dollars in 2018, which is about $11,172 per person (Cussen, 2019). Some hospitals help patient’s out when they are unable to afford their medical bills which helps the hospital absolve their hospital-related debt (Cussen, 2019). Afterwards, these debts are more than likely transferred to their community needs. Best Practices Alexian Brothers Medical Center like mentioned earlier got a good report. Even so, there is always ways to improve on things to help for improvement. My unit already weighs every patient in the morning regardless if they have heart failure or not. The unit does a pretty good job with intake and output monitoring. The one thing I would try to promote is forming that of a checklist for heart failure patients. This checklist would be based on making sure that the patient’s get properly educated as well with the correct orders while they are in the hospitals. This would hopefully try to reduce the number or readmissions. Plan Implementation Make the checklist
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HEART FAILURE 27 This checklist would be those just that came in with heart failure exacerbation or a brand-new diagnosis. The checklist will have to include a lot of teaching components. The checklist should include in standard admission orders for those patients. The patient should have a modified diet of low sodium or cardiac diet. At my facility we have to weigh everyone, but it is anytime after 7pm that we can weigh them. For heart failure patients only, they need to be weighed only in the morning. Staff need to make sure that the patient has a urinal or hat at all times to measure their output.
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  • Winter '20
  • Stacy Manning

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