Collateral Ligament connects cannon bone to pastern bone Suspensory Ligament acts like a sling over the other ligaments The fetlock joint has many

Collateral ligament connects cannon bone to pastern

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Collateral Ligament- connects cannon bone to pastern bone.Suspensory Ligament -acts like a sling over the other ligaments.The fetlock joint has many possible injuries. As well as a variety of fractures, there are many types of ligament injuries. The most common are strains, pulls and sesamoid fracture (caused by a ligament pulling free, taking the sesamoid bone with it).Cannon Bone- The cannon bone is the longest single bone in the lower leg. Splint bones are attached on each side even with the upper end of the cannon bone by interosseous ligaments. These ligaments eventually ossify (turn into bone) with age, joining the cannon and splint bones. CannonBone
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514 - H H o r s e P r o j e c t G u i d e - Parts of the HorseThe suspensory ligament continues up the back of the leg.Horses can sleep standing up because of the check ligamentat the back of the knee. While the horse is awake, a muscle holds the knee straight. When the horse goes to sleep, this muscle relaxes and the check ligament keeps the knee from buckling forward because it is attached to the deep flexor tendons.The lower leg area is subject to a variety of stress injuries. Splint bones are easily injured because they are not firmly attached at both ends. The most common injuries are caused by strain from exercise or poorly aligned knees. This puts extra pressure, or force, on the splint bones causing them to break or become inflamed. They may also be caused from hitting the splint bone with the opposite hoof.Knee -The knee is made up of seven carpal bones located between the cannon bone and the radius. These bones are joined together by short collateral ligaments. These keep the carpal bones from separating. Longer ligaments are located on the sides to keep the layers of bones from separating. The suspensory ligament from the cannon bones is attached to the third and fourth carpal bones.To move the knee, there are two carpal extensor tendons, two digital extensor tendons and two digital flexor tendons.Most knee injuries are caused by poor lower leg conformation. If the cannon bone is not centered below the carpal bones, there will be excess pressure on the carpal bones. This can cause fractures or arthritis.
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524 - H H o r s e P r o j e c t G u i d e - Parts of the HorseUpper Leg and Elbow- The upper leg and elbow are made up of the:RadiusUlnaHumerousIn the upper leg, we finally see muscle. If you look at the forearm muscle, it looks short. It is longer than it appears because it does a three quarter wrap around the bone as it goes toward the body of the horse. The muscles are interesting because they can move the body forward when the horse stands on the leg or moves the leg forward when there is no weight on the leg.This area is important to the stride of the horse. The length of the humerus affects how far the leg can swing forward and upward.
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  • Fall '15
  • Horse anatomy, cannon bone

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