England and criticized the seizure of indian lands

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England and criticized the seizure of Indian lands without fair compensation and the authority of the government to regulate religious behavior. Was banished from the Bay Colony in 1635Rhode Island: Roger Williams escaped here after he was banished. He established complete religious freedom and the separation of Church and state, making Rhode Island the most liberal of the settlements. It attracted outcasts from the other settlements, and was thus known as "Rogues' Island"Rev. Thomas Hooker: Led a group of Boston Puritans into the Hartford area in 1636Fundamental Orders: Document drafted in 1639 by the settlers of the New Connecticut River colony which established a government democratically controlled by certain citizensNew Haven: A failed settlement of Puritans also in the Connecticut area who hoped to establish even closer ties between the church and government but was eventually merged with the Connecticut River colony in 1662Sir Fernando Gorges: Led unsuccessful attempts at colonizing Maine in 1623New Hampshire: Colony initially absorbed by the Bay colony in 1641 and later separated into an independent colony in 1679Self-governing colonies: A colony with an elected governing body such as Virginia, which had the House of Burgesses, an elected legislatureMassasoit: Wampanoag chieftain who signed a treaty with the Plymouth Pilgrims in 1621
King Phillip's War: Massasoit's son Metacom formed an alliance of Indians and began attacking colonial settlements in 1675 until his forces were defeated in 1676. This war drastically slowed colonial expansion to the west, but the Indian resistance in the region was all but goneNew England Confederation: A union of four colonies in 1643 to defend against threats and tackle inter colonial problems. Consisted of the Massachusetts Bay colony, Plymouth, New Haven, and other scattered settlements in Connecticut, all strongly PuritanSalutary "benign" neglect: The lack of attention from the English monarchy towards the colonies in their early years and during the English Civil War, allowing the colonies to become semi-autonomous commonwealths. Period when the Navigation Laws were weakly enforcedDominion of New England: A confederation of the New England, New York, and Jersey colonies imposed by the British government in 1686 to bolster defense and to increase efficiency in administering the Navigation LawsEnglish Navigation Laws: A set of British laws which banned colonial trade with foreign nations to bring the colonies closer with England. As a result smuggling became commonSir Edmund Andros: The loathed head of the New Dominion who greatly restricted the freedoms of the colonistsGlorious Revolution: The 1688-1689 rebellion which left the Catholic James II dethroned and ceded power to Protestant rulers William III and Mary II. Led to the collapse of the DominionJames II: Unpopular Catholic monarch who was dethroned in the Glorious RevolutionWilliam III: Dutch-born Protestant ruler brought to the throne by the Glorious RevolutionMary II: Wife of William III and daughter of James II

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