Its shown in the analysis that Nothing ends a fine night of socializing faster

Its shown in the analysis that nothing ends a fine

This preview shows page 34 - 37 out of 54 pages.

It’s shown in the analysis that: Nothing ends a fine night of socializing faster than the "go home and think of your dead husband and your dozen abortions" blast. Now, let’s shift from Fahrenheit 451 and smoothly move to The Martian Chronicles. The language of this novel is rather romantic, very sensitive and sometimes tender even. Here the author wanted to compare the life of our Earth and impossible life on the Mars, to compare these two nations in order to categorize people, to show the bitter similarity or amazing difference between us, The Earth people and the Martians. This analysis should lead people to realize their mistakes and to improve the situation on the Earth at least. The first extract is From "The Luggage Store" "I know, we came up here to get away from things - politics, the atom bomb, war, pressure groups, prejudice, laws -1 know. But it's still home there. You wait and see. When the first bomb drops on America the people up here'll start thinking. They haven't been here long enough. A couple years is all. If they'd been here forty years, it'd be different, but they got relatives down there, and their home towns." (132)
Image of page 34
- 3 4 - The store proprietor reasons correctly why the Mars settlers will return home in the face of war on Earth. In doing so, he points out an inherent contradiction for settlers and immigrants of all sorts: they leave their homes in order to escape all the bad things and start anew, but as humans they still have roots and must pay heed to those roots when they are threatened. One can head to a bold new future, but the past is a powerful anchor for those who can still remember it. From ’’The OffSeason”: "Good old wonderful Earth. Send me your hungry and your starved. Something, something - how does that poem go? Send me your hungry, old Earth. Here's Sam Parkhill, his hot dogs all boiled, his chili cooking, everything neat as a pin. Come on, you Earth, send me your rocket!" (143) Sam Parkhill not only desecrates the Martian landscape with his hot dog stand, he does the same to the poem associated with the Statue of Liberty. With his focus on personal benefit at the expense of all else - as well as the hubris to think of Earth as his to exploit - he is the book’s clearest example of how man’s noble quest for advancement can be corrupted and turned into something quite different. Earth changed in the black sky. It caught fire. Part of it seemed to come apart in a million pieces, as if a gigantic jigsaw had exploded. It burned with an unholy dripping glare for a minute, three times normal size, then dwindled. "What was that? " Sam looked at the green fire in the sky. "Earth," said Elma, holding her hands together. (143) This description of Earth finally succumbing to atomic war and humans on the last march to self-destruction is typical Bradbury: simple declarative sentences with a disarmingly mundane simile (the exploding jigsaw
Image of page 35
- 3 5 - puzzle) manages to convey an objective sense of the horror the Parkhills witness, making it both vivid and oddly distant for the reader.
Image of page 36
Image of page 37

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 54 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture