Velocity The speed of an object moving in a specific direction A car traveling

Velocity the speed of an object moving in a specific

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Velocity The speed of an object moving in a specific direction. A car traveling at 35 miles per hour is a measurement of speed. Observing that a car is traveling 35 miles per hour due north is a measurement of velocity. Venus An inner, terrestrial (rocky) planet that is slightly smaller than Earth. Located between the orbits of Mercury and Earth, Venus has a very thick atmosphere that is covered by a layer of clouds that produce a “greenhouse effect” on the planet. Venus’s surface temperature is roughly 480°C (900°F), making it the hottest planet in the solar system. Very Large Array (VLA) One of the world’s premier radio observatories, consisting of 27 antennas arranged in a huge “Y” pattern. The VLA spans up to 22 miles (36km) across, which is roughly one and a half times the size of Washington, D.C. Each antenna is 81 feet (25 meters) in diameter. Located in Socorro, New Mexico, the telescopes work in tandem to produce a sharper image than any single telescope could record. Created by TechBrick Robotics [email protected]
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/ 410.838.8264 / [email protected] TERM DEFINITION Visible light The part of the electromagnetic spectrum that human eyes can detect; also known as the visible spectrum. The colors of the rainbow make up visible light. Blue light has more energy than red light. Volcano A break or vent in the crust of a planet or moon that can spew extremely hot ash, scorching gases, and molten rock. The term volcano also refers to the mountain formed by volcanic material. Wave A vibration in some media that transfers energy from one place to another. Sound waves are vibrations passing in air. Light waves are vibrations in electromagnetic fields. Wavelength The distance between two wave crests. Radio waves can have lengths of several feet; the wavelengths of X-rays are roughly the size of atoms. Wavelength and frequency Light is measured by its wavelength (in nanometers) or frequency (in Hertz). One wavelength: equals the distance between two successive wave crests or troughs. Frequency (Hertz): equals the number of waves that passes a given point per second. Weak force The force that governs the change of one kind of elementary particle into another. This force is associated with radioactive processes that involve neutrons. White dwarf star The hot, compact remains of a low-mass star like our Sun that has exhausted its sources of fuel for thermonuclear fusion. White dwarf stars are generally about the size of the Earth. Wide Field / Planetary Camera (WF/PC) A collection of eight separate, yet interconnected, cameras originally used as the main optical instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. Four cameras were used in tandem to observe in either wide-field, low-resolution mode or narrow- field, high-resolution (planetary) mode. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera2 replaced the WF/PC during the December 1993 servicing mission. Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) The Hubble Space Telescopes workhorse instrument, WFPC2 snapped high-resolution images of faraway objects. Its 48 filters allowed scientists to study precise wavelengths of light and to sense a range of wavelengths from ultraviolet to near-infrared light. The instruments four CCDs (charge-coupled devices) collected information from stars and galaxies to make photographs. WFPC2 was installed aboard the Hubble telescope during the December 1993 servicing mission
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