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Heath She goes on to explain some of the other downfalls to this program. They have recruits come from other countries to learn how we run businesses here and then go back home and use to help them interact with U.S. customers. In efforts to try and prevent this they program tries something called “knowledge transfer”, this is when H-1B workers replaces U.S. employees at lower pay. “The median pay for H-1B computing professionals in fiscal 2005 was $50,000, which means half earn less than that. An American information-technology worker with a bachelor's degree makes more than $50,000 in an entry-level job.” For me this is kind of hard to believe. The U.S. is supposed to be this place where people can come and be treated equal, and get a job, and be able to have a family, and just feel safe. By doing this we aren’t equal. I understand the issue where foreign graduates will just learn our ways and go home to share the knowledge, but what about those that actually want to stay here and make a living for them selves? Forma Harrop’s article was very enlightening, but also very biased. As I had mentioned before she only lists maybe two points that make this program seem like it has some benefit. And yes, maybe the program doesn’t benefit U.S. workers in anyway, but I feel like she purposely left out all of that information, and just talked about all the cons to this program, just so she would be able to persuade us that this program is bad. 4
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Heath Works Cited Friedman, Thomas L. “30 Little Turtles.”  New York Times  29 Feb. 2004. Rpt. in  The  Allyn &Bacon Guide to Writing.  John D. Ramage, John C. Bean, and June Johnson. 7 th  ed. New  York: Pearson, 2015. 120-21. Print. Harrop, Froma. "New Threat to Skilled U.S. Workers."  The Seattle Times . 17 Apr. 2007.  Web. 16 Sept. 2015. 5
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  • Fall '16
  • Carol Luvert
  • Thought, Want, A Good Thing, Stephanie Malinowski

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