{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Passage 4 1 a argument for it to be an argument there

Info icon This preview shows pages 10–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Passage 4 1. a) Argument. For it to be an argument, there must be some point that is controversial or in dispute. In this case, the report is telling us about an argument made by an older gentleman. Since this is an arrest report, it seems that there is some controversy about what he is saying. That suggests this is an argument. See pp. 84–85, 87–91, 93–96. 2. a) Simple. A simple argument consists of a single conclusion, with a set of premises that support it. In this case, we have one clear conclusion, that the young man had it wrong. So, it is a simple argument. See p. 82. 3. b) The young man had it wrong. The conclusion is the claim that all other claims in the argument establish. The claim that the young man had it wrong is not used to establish another claim, so it is the conclusion. See pp. 84–85. 4. c) Premise 1: The young man had it wrong. Premise 2: The young man had been overly aggressive. Premise 3: The older gentleman is a decent taxpayer. Conclusion 1: The older gentleman did not deserve this sort of treatment. A conclusion is whatever receives support from another claim; a premise is whatever gives support to another claim. See pp. 89, 93, 95 for examples. Passage 5 1. a) Argument. For it to be an argument, there must be some point that is controversial or in dispute. In this case, it seems disputed that the boss is a jerk. After all, the arguer does provide reasons to think that the boss is a jerk, which would be unusual if the audience accepted that fact. See pp. 84–85, 87–91, 93–96. 2. b) Extended. An extended argument consists of a central or main conclusion, with several other sub-conclusions supported throughout the argument. In this case, there are at least two conclusions, including the central or main conclusion. See p. 82. 3. c) My boss is a jerk. A conclusion indicator word or phrase is used to indicate that what follows is a claim that other claims try to support or establish. “Therefore” serves that purpose, so what follows it must be a conclusion. See pp. 84–85. 4. b) He started taking my tips; Since. A premise indicator word or phrase is used to indicate that what follows is a reason or a piece of evidence for a conclusion. “ Since ” serves that purpose, so what follows it must be a premise. See pp. 84–85. 5. b) Premise 1: He started taking my tips. Conclusion 1: My boss is a jerk. Conclusion 2: He even cut my hours. Premise 2: I used to work 40 a week, now I’m down to 25.
Image of page 10

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon