US Army gasoline engined tanks during World War II were nicknamed Ronsons

Us army gasoline engined tanks during world war ii

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outdoors, or in sewers. US Army gasoline-engined tanks during World War II were nicknamed Ronsons , because of their greater likelihood of catching fire when damaged by enemy fire. (Although tank fires were usually caused by detonation of the ammunition rather than fuel). Maintenance hazards Fuel injection introduces potential hazards in engine maintenance due to the high fuel pressures used. Residual pressure can remain in the fuel lines long after an injection- equipped engine has been shut down. This residual pressure must be relieved, and if it is done so by external bleed-off, the fuel must be safely contained. If a high-pressure diesel fuel injector is removed from its seat and operated in open air, there is a risk to the operator of injury by hypodermic jet-injection , even with only 100 psi pressure. The first known such injury occurred in 1937 during a diesel engine maintenance operation. Cancer Diesel exhaust has been classified as an IARC Group 1 carcinogen . It is a cause of lung cancer and is associated with and increased risk for bladder cancer .
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Diesel applications The characteristics of diesel have different advantages for different applications. Passenger cars Diesel engines have long been popular in bigger cars and have been used in smaller cars such as superminis like the Peugeot 205 , in Europe since the 1980s. Diesel engines tend to be more economical at regular driving speeds and are much better at city speeds. Their reliability and life-span tend to be better (as detailed). Some 40% or more of all cars sold in Europe are diesel-powered where they are considered a low CO 2 option. Mercedes-Benz in conjunction with Robert Bosch GmbH produced diesel-powered passenger cars starting in 1936 and very large numbers are used all over the world (often as "Grande Taxis" in the Third World ). Railroad rolling stock Diesel engines have eclipsed steam engines as the prime mover on all non-electrified railroads in the industrialized world. The first diesel locomotives appeared in the early 20th century, and diesel multiple units soon after. While electric locomotives have now replaced the diesel locomotive almost completely on passenger traffic in Europe and Asia, diesel is still today very popular for cargo- hauling freight trains and on tracks where electrification is not feasible. Most modern diesel locomotives are actually diesel-electric locomotives : the diesel engine is used to power an electric generator that in turn powers electric traction motors with no mechanical connection between diesel engine and traction. Other transport uses Larger transport applications ( trucks , buses , etc.) also benefit from the Diesel's reliability and high torque output. Diesel displaced paraffin (or tractor vaporising oil , TVO) in most parts of the world by the end of the 1950s with the U.S. following some 20 years later.
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